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Tumor Biology

, Volume 34, Issue 3, pp 1685–1689 | Cite as

Overexpression of keratin 17 is associated with poor prognosis in epithelial ovarian cancer

  • Ya-Feng Wang
  • Hai-Yang Lang
  • Jing Yuan
  • Jun Wang
  • Rui Wang
  • Xin-Hui Zhang
  • Jie Zhang
  • Tao Zhao
  • Yu-Rong Li
  • Jun-Ye Liu
  • Li-Hua Zeng
  • Guo-Zhen Guo
Research Article

Abstract

The aim of this study was to investigate the association between keratin 17 (K17) expression and the clinicopathological features of patients with epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC). K17 expression was detected by real-time quantitative RT-PCR in EOC and adjacent noncancerous tissues. In addition, K17 expression was analyzed by immunohistochemistry in 104 clinicopathologically characterized EOC cases. The expression levels of K17 mRNA and protein in EOC tissues were both significantly higher than those in noncancerous tissues. In addition, positive expression of K17 correlated with the clinical stage (p = 0.001). Furthermore, Kaplan–Meier survival analysis showed that a high expression level of K17 resulted in a significantly poor prognosis of EOC patients. Multivariate analysis revealed that EOC expression level was an independent prognostic parameter for the overall survival rate of EOC patients. Our data are the first to suggest that increased K17 expression in EOC is significantly associated with aggressive progression and poor prognosis. K17 may be an important molecular marker for predicting the carcinogenesis, progression, and prognosis of EOC.

Keywords

K17 EOC Biomarker Prognosis 

Notes

Acknowledgments

This work was supported by International Science and Technology Cooperation Program of China & Japan (no. 2010DFA31900), Major State Basic Research Development Program (2011CB503704), Program for Changjiang Scholars and Innovative Research Team in University, and National Natural Science Foundation of China (no. 60971055).

Conflicts of interest

None

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Copyright information

© International Society of Oncology and BioMarkers (ISOBM) 2013

Authors and Affiliations

  • Ya-Feng Wang
    • 1
  • Hai-Yang Lang
    • 1
  • Jing Yuan
    • 2
  • Jun Wang
    • 3
  • Rui Wang
    • 4
  • Xin-Hui Zhang
    • 5
  • Jie Zhang
    • 1
  • Tao Zhao
    • 1
  • Yu-Rong Li
    • 1
  • Jun-Ye Liu
    • 1
  • Li-Hua Zeng
    • 1
  • Guo-Zhen Guo
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Radiological Medicine and the Ministry of Education Key Lab of Hazard Assessment and Control in Special Operational Environment, School of Public HealthFourth Military Medical UniversityXi’anChina
  2. 2.Department of Information TechnologyThe General Hospital of Jinan Military CommandJi’nanChina
  3. 3.Department of OsteologyPeople’s Hospital of Langzhong City in Sichuan ProvinceLangzhongChina
  4. 4.Department of Health Statistics and the Ministry of Education Key Lab of Hazard Assessment and Control in Special Operational Environment, School of Public HealthFourth Military Medical UniversityXi’anChina
  5. 5.Department of Gynecologic OncologyAffiliated Cancer Hospital of Zhengzhou UniversityZhengzhouChina

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