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Influence of various intensities of 528 Hz sound-wave in production of testosterone in rat’s brain and analysis of behavioral changes

Abstract

Testosterone is a nuclear androgen receptor ligand that controls multiple pathways in brain. In addition to the active biosynthesis of steroids in classic steroidogenic organs such as gonads, adrenals and placenta, testosterone also produced in astrocyte cells of brain. Testosterone and its level must be regulated in brain; because, it directly and indirectly affects memory and several key behavioral characteristics. The significance of sound waves on key enzymes that regulate levels of testosterone in brain has not been investigated. The aim of our study was to examine physical stress of such as sound on induction behavioral changes in animal models. According to the current study, sound waves with 528 Hz frequency in 100 dB intensity induce testosterone production in brain by enhancing StAR and SF-1 and reducing P450 aromatase gene expression. Frequency of 528 Hz also reduces total concentration of reactive oxidative species in brain tissue. Prolonged exposure to this sound wave showed reduction of anxiety related behaviors in rats. The results reveal that reduced anxiety is related to increased concentration of testosterone in brain. This study may lead to ascertain a possible therapy in which sounds may be utilized to reduce anxiety in individual.

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Acknowledgements

We thank prof. B. Bolouri for technical assistance and data analysis.

Funding

This research did not receive any specific grant from funding agencies in the public, commercial, or not-for-profit sectors.

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Authors and Affiliations

Authors

Contributions

TBD, EF and FHK conceived the experiments, TBD and GHR and SP conducted the experiments and analyzed the results. All authors reviewed the manuscript.

Corresponding author

Correspondence to G. H. Riazi.

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All authors declare that they have no conflict of interest in this report.

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The authors assert that all applicable international, national, and/or institutional guidelines for the care and use of animals were followed.

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Babayi Daylari, T., Riazi, G.H., Pooyan, S. et al. Influence of various intensities of 528 Hz sound-wave in production of testosterone in rat’s brain and analysis of behavioral changes. Genes Genom 41, 201–211 (2019). https://doi.org/10.1007/s13258-018-0753-6

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  • DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/s13258-018-0753-6

Keywords

  • Testosterone
  • Astrocyte
  • StAR
  • SF-1
  • P450 aromatase
  • 528 Hz frequency