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Magnetic Nanochain-Based Smart Drug Delivery System with Remote Tunable Drug Release by a Magnetic Field

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Abstract

Considerable attention is given to drug delivery technology that efficiently delivers appropriate levels of drug molecules to diseased sites with significant therapeutic efficacy. Nanotechnology has been used to develop various strategies for targeted drug delivery, while controlling the release of drugs because of its many benefits. Here, a delivery system was designed to control drug release by external magnetic fields using porous silica and magnetic nanoparticles. Magnetic nanochains (MNs) of various lengths (MN-1: 1.4 ± 0.8 μm, MN-2: 2.2 ± 1.1 μm, and MN-3: 5.3 ± 2.0 μm) were synthesized by controlling the exposure time of the external magnetic force in magnetic nanoaggregates (MNCs). Mesoporous silica-coated magnetic nanochains (MSMNs) (MSMN-1, MSMN-2, and MSMN-3) were prepared by forming a porous silica layer through sol–gel polymerization. These MSMNs could load the drug doxorubicin (DOX) into the silica layer (DOX-MSMNs) and control the release behavior of the DOX through an external rotating magnetic field. Simulations and experiments were used to verify the motion and drug release behavior of the MSMNs. Furthermore, a bio-receptor (aptamer, Ap) was introduced onto the surface of the DOX-MSMNs (Ap-DOX-MSMNs) that could recognize specific cancer cells. The Ap-DOX-MSMNs demonstrated a strong therapeutic effect on cancer cells that was superior to that of the free DOX. The potent ability of these MSMNs as an external stimulus-responsive drug delivery system was proven.

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Acknowledgements

 This research was supported by National R&D Programs through the National Research Foundation (NRF) of Korea funded by Ministry of Science and ICT (MSIT) of Korea (NRF-2021M3E5E3080379, NRF-2018M3A9E2022821, NRF-2018M3A9E2022819, and NRF-2022R1C1C1008815), Korea Evaluation Institute of Industrial Technology (KEIT) grant funded by the Korea government (MOTIE) (No. RS-2022-00154853), Technology Development Program for Biological Hazards Management in Indoor Air through the Korea Environment Industry & Technology Institute (KEITI) funded by Ministry of Environment (ME) of Korea (2021003370003 and RE202101004), Korea Health Technology R&D Project through the Korea Health Industry Development Institute (KHIDI), funded by the Ministry of Health & Welfare, Republic of Korea (grant number: HI21C2461), and KRIBB Research Initiative Program (1711134081).

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Correspondence to Yong-Min Huh, Seungjoo Haam or Eun-Kyung Lim.

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Kang, B., Shin, MK., Han, S. et al. Magnetic Nanochain-Based Smart Drug Delivery System with Remote Tunable Drug Release by a Magnetic Field. BioChip J 16, 280–290 (2022). https://doi.org/10.1007/s13206-022-00072-1

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