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3 Biotech

, 8:149 | Cite as

Fundamentals and commercial aspects of nanobiosensors in point-of-care clinical diagnostics

  • Kuldeep Mahato
  • Pawan Kumar Maurya
  • Pranjal Chandra
Review Article

Abstract

Among various problems faced by mankind, health-related concerns are prevailing since long which are commonly found in the form of infectious diseases and different metabolic disorders. The clinical cure and management of such abnormalities are greatly dependent on the availability of their diagnoses. The conventional diagnostics used for such purposes are extremely powerful; however, most of these are limited by time-consuming protocols and require higher volume of test sample, etc. A new evolving technology called “biosensor” in this context shows an enormous potential for an alternative diagnostic device, which constantly compliments the conventional diagnoses. In this review, we have summarized different kinds of biosensors and their fundamental understanding with various state-of-the-art examples. A critical examination of different types of biosensing mechanisms is also reported highlighting the advantages of electrochemical biosensors for its great potentials in next-generation commercially viable modules. In recent years, a number of nanomaterials are extensively used to enhance not only the performance of biosensing mechanism, but also obtain robust, cheap, and fabrication-friendly durable mechanism. Herein, we have summarized the importance of nanomaterials in biosensing mechanism, their syntheses as well as characterization techniques. Subsequently, we have discussed the probe fabrication processes along with various techniques for assessing its analytical performances and potentials for commercial viability.

Keywords

Biosensor Nanomaterial Healthcare Commercialization Point-of-care detection 

Notes

Acknowledgements

This work is supported DST-ECRA research grant (ECR/2016/000100) awarded to Dr. Pranjal Chandra. KM acknowledges the Ph.D. research fellowship supported by IIT-Guwahati.

Compliance with ethical standards

Conflict of interest

Authors declared that there is no conflict of interest.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag GmbH Germany, part of Springer Nature 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department of Bioscience and BioengineeringIndian Institute of Technology GuwahatiGuwahatiIndia
  2. 2.Amity Institute of Biotechnology, Amity UniversityNoidaIndia

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