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Obituary: Wolfgang Siegfried Gunther Maass 1929–2016

Abstract

With the passing of Wolfgang Maass, Nova Scotia, Canada, and indeed the entire world of lichenology has lost an important pioneer in the documentation of the lichen flora of northeastern North America and a researcher dedicated to understanding the complex nature of lichen chemistry.

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Reports

  1. Cameron RP, Neilly T, Clayden S, Maass WSG (2009) COSEWIC assessment and status report on the vole ears Erioderma mollissimum in Canada. Ottawa, 51 pp

  2. Maass WSG (1993) Natural vegetation baseline study: air effcbects monitoring program, Point Aconi Unit No 1. Lichens and Sphagnum Mosses as Bioindicators. Report to Nova Scotia Power

  3. Maass WSG, Richardson DHS (1994) A natural vegetation baseline study involving lichens and Sphagnum mosses as part of the air effects monitoring program. Report to Nova Scotia Power

  4. Maass WSG, Yetman D (2002) COSEWIC assessment and status report on the boreal felt lichen, Erioderma pedicellatum, in Canada. Committee on the Status of Endangered Wildlife in Canada, Ottawa. 50 pp

Publications by subjectNatural product chemistry of lichens, fungi, bryophytes and clubmosses

  1. Brewer D, Maass WSG, Taylor A (1977) The effect on fungal growth of some 2,5-dihydroxy-1,4-benzoquinones. Can J Microbiol 23:845–851

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  2. Craigie JS, Maass WSG (1966) The cation exchanger in Sphagnum spp. Ann Bot 30:153–154

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  3. Fox CH, Maass WSG, Forrest TP (1969a) Papulosin, a novel chlorinated anthraquinone from Lasallia papulosa (Ach.) Llano. Tetrahedron Lett 1969:919–922

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  4. Fox CH, Maass WSG, Lamb IM (1969b) The occurrence of porphyrilic acid in the genus Stereocaulon and the identity of dendroidin. J Jpn Bot 44:361–366

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  5. Grigsby RD, Jamieson WD, McInnes AG, Maass WSG, Taylor A (1974) The mass spectra of derivatives of polyporic acid. J Chem 52:4117

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  6. Jerram WA, McInnes AG, Maass WSG, Smith DG, Taylor A, Walter JA (1975) The chemistry of cochliodinal, a metabolite of Chaetomium spp. Canadian Journal of Chemistry 53: 727. [+ erratum, p. 2031]

  7. Maass WSG (1970a) Pulvinamide and possible biosynthetic relationships with pulvinic acid. Phytochemistry 9:2477–2481

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  8. Maass WSG (1970b) Lichen substances. IV. Incorporation of pulvinic-14C acids into calycin by the lichen Pseudocyphellaria crocata. Can J Biochem 48:1241–1248

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  9. Maass WSG (1975a) Lichen substances. V. Methylated derivatives of orsellinic acid, lecanoric acid, and gyrophoric acid from Pseudocyphellaria crocata. Can J Bot 53:1031–1039

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  10. Maass WSG (1975b) Lichen substances VII. Identification of orsellinate derivatives from Lobaria linita. Bryologist 78:178–182

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  11. Maass WSG (1975c) Lichen substances VIII. Phenolic constituents of Pseudocyphellaria quercifolia. Bryologist 78:183–186

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  12. Maass WSG (1975d) The phenolic constituents of Peltigera aphthosa. Phytochemistry 14:2487–2489

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  13. Maass WSG, Craigie JS (1964) Examination of some soluble constituents of Sphagnum gametophytes. Can J Bot 42:805–813

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  14. Maass WSG, Hanson AW (1986) Wrightiin, a new chlorinated depside from Erioderma wrightii. Z Naturforsch 117:1589–1592

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  15. Maass WSG, Neish AC (1967) Lichen substances II: biosynthesis of calycin and pulvinic dilactone by the lichen, Pseudocyphellaria crocata. Can J Bot 45:59–72

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  16. Maass WSG, Towers GHN, Neish AC (1964) Flechtenstoffe. I. Untersuchungen zur Biogenese des Pulvinsaureanhydrids. Ber Deut Bot Ges 77:157–161

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  17. Maass WSG, Hutzinger O, Safe S (1975–1976) Metabolism of 4-chlorobiphenyl by lichens. Arch Environ Contam Toxicol 3: 470–478

  18. Maass WSG, McInnes AG, Smith DG, Taylor A (1977) Lichen substances. X. Physciosporin, a new chlorinated depsidone. Can J Chem 55:2839–2844

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  19. Safe S, Safe LM, Maass WSG (1975) Sterols of three lichen species. Lobaria pulmonaria, Lobaria scrobiculata and Usnea longissima. Phytochemistry 14:1821–1823

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  20. Towers GHN, Maass WSG (1965) Phenolic acids and lignins in the Lycopodiales. Phytochemistry 4:57–66

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Biogeography and taxonomy of Sphagnum and other mosses

  1. Ahti T, Isoviita P, Maass WSG (1965) Dicranum leioneuron Kindb. new to the British Isles and Labrador, with a description of the sporophyte. Bryologist 68:197–201

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  2. Maass WSG (1965a) Sphagnum dusenii and Sphagnum balticum in Britain. Bryologist 68:211–217

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  3. Maass WSG (1965b) Zur Kenntnis des Sphagnum angermanicum in Europa. Sven Bot Tidskr 59:332–344

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  4. Maass WSG (1966a) Studies on the taxonomy and distribution of Sphagnum I. Sphagnum pylaesii and Sphagnum angermanicum in Quebec and some phytogeographic considerations. Bryologist 65:97–100

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  5. Maass WSG (1966b) Untersuchungen über die Taxonomie und Verbreitung von Sphagnum VI. Sphagnum pylaesii Brid. und das boreoatlantische Florelement unter den Torfmoosen in Südamerika. Nova Hedwigia 12:270–273

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  6. Maass WSG (1967a) Studies on the taxonomy and distribution of Sphagnum II Sphagnum angermanicum Melin in North America and its relation to allied species. Nova Hedwigia 13:449–467

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  7. Maass WSG (1967b) Studies on the taxonomy and distribution of Sphagnum III. Observations on Sphagnum macrophyllum in the northern part of its range. Bryologist 70:177–192

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  8. Maass WSG (1967c) Studies on the taxonomy and distribution of Sphagnum IV: Sphagnum majus, Sphagnum annulatum, Sphagnum mendocinum, and Sphagnum obtusum in North America. Nova Hedwigia 14:187–214

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  9. Maass WSG (1967d) Studies on the taxonomy and distribution of Sphagnum V. A new species of Sphagnum from Quebec. Bryologist 70:193–196

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  10. Maass WSG (1978) Studies on the taxonomy and distribution of Sphagnum VIII. The fruiting of Sphagnum pylaesii in Nova Scotia and its chromosome number. Proc N S Inst Sci 28:161–162

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  11. Maass WSG (1980a) Studies on the taxonomy and distribution of Sphagnum. VIII [sic]. Rediscovery of Sphagnum macrophyllum var. burinense. Proc N S Inst Sci 30:183–187

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  12. Maass WSG, Harvey MJ (1973) Studies on the taxonomy and distribution of Sphagnum. VII. Chromosome numbers in Sphagnum. Nova Hedwigia 24:193–205

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Biogeography, ecology, pollution-sensitivity, and conservation of lichens

  1. Cameron RP, Anderson F, Maass WGS (2010) Lichens of Scatarie Island wilderness area. Proc N S Inst Sci 45:69–78

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  2. Gorham E, Underwood JK, Janssens JA, Freedman B, Maass W, Waller DH, Ogden JG (1998) The chemistry of streams in central and southwestern Nova Scotia, with particular reference to catchment vegetation and the influence of dissolved organic carbon primarily from wetlands. Wetlands 18:115–132

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  3. Hoisington BL, Maass WSG (1982) Cavernularia hultenii in northernmost Newfoundland and southern Labrador. Bryologist 85:122–125

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  4. Maass WSG (1980b) Erioderma pedicellatum in North America: a case study of a rare and endangered lichen. Proc N S Inst Sci 30:69–87

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  5. Maass WSG (1980) Lichens as biological indicators of air pollution. In: Proceedings of the Symposium on Environmental Studies in Jamaica, May 25 & 26, 1979. Edited by C. Davis. Scientific Research Council Press, Kingston, Jamaica, pp. 153–193

  6. Maass WSG (1981) New observations on the distribution and ecology of Cavernularia hultenii in eastern North America. Proc N S Inst Sci 31:193–206

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  7. Maass WSG (1983) New observations on Erioderma in North America. Nord J Bot 3:567–576

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  8. Maass WSG (1986) Moelleropsis (Lecanorales) as a component of Erioderma habitats in Atlantic Canada. Proc N S Inst Sci 37:21–36

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  9. Maass W (1999) Evidence for effects of long-range transported air pollution (LRTAP) on epiphytic lichens and their phorophytes along a gradient between the mountains of New England and Newfoundland. In Anon. (ed.). International Conference on Lichen Conservation Biology, Licons. Swiss Federal Institute for Forest, Snow and Landscape Research, Birmensdorf, Switzerland, p. 37 [Abstract]

  10. Maass WSG, Yetman DJ (2002) COSEWIC Assessment and Status Report on the Boreal Felt Lichen Erioderma pedicellatum in Canada. Committee on the Status of Endangered Wildlife in Canada, Ottawa. 50 pages

  11. Maass WSG, Hoisington BL, Harries H (1986) Pannaria lurida in Atlantic Canada. Proc N S Inst Sci 36:131–135

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  12. Veinotte C, Freedman B, Maass WSG, Kirstein F (2003) Comparison of the ground vegetation in spruce plantations and natural forest in the Greater Fundy ecosystem, New Brunswick. Can Field-Naturalist 117:531–540

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Acknowledgments

The authors would like to thank the following who contributed information to this obituary: Mr. Oliver Maass, Halifax, Nova Scotia, Dr. Teuvo Ahti, Helsinki, Finland, Prof. Dr. Christoph Scheidegger, Switzerland, Dr. Ian Craigie, Halifax, Nova Scotia, Ms. Bernadette Kennedy, Librarian, National Research Council Laboratory (Atlantic Research Laboratory Newsletter 1987), Frances Anderson, Nova Scotia, and Prof. M.R.D. Seaward, Bradford University, U.K. Dr. Stephen Clayden, New Brunswick Museum, Saint John, kindly assembled and provided the list of publications by Dr. Maass and his colleagues.

Wolfgang was a member of the International Association of Lichenologists until 1983. He is mentioned in the IAL Bulletin as follows:

1968 – Canadian funding was found for C.Fox (USA) to work as a postdoctoral fellow to study at Atlantic Regional Laboratories in Halifax, N.S. with Maass

1976 – Maass recently spent about a month in New Zealand working on lichen chemistry with Dr. Ted Corbett and Prof. Baylis (Univ. of Otago); he also visited Dr J.A.Elix at Canberra

1979 (April) – Jean Dixon (Jamaica) spent several months with Maass in Halifax learning techniques in lichen chemotaxonomy – she was basically interested in the effect of dust from bauxite industry on tropical lichens

1979 (Oct.) – Maass has developed a technique for making single spore cultures from individual asci of four lichen species, developed for the investigation of lichen genetics

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Correspondence to David H. S. Richardson.

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Richardson, D.H.S., Cameron, R. Obituary: Wolfgang Siegfried Gunther Maass 1929–2016. Symbiosis 69, 199–203 (2016). https://doi.org/10.1007/s13199-016-0421-z

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Keywords

  • Chemistry of lichens
  • Taxonomy of Sphagnum
  • Air pollution
  • Conservation of lichens