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Journal of Food Science and Technology

, Volume 54, Issue 13, pp 4501–4509 | Cite as

Optimization and characterization of high pressure homogenization produced chemically modified starch nanoparticles

  • Yongbo Ding
  • Jianquan KanEmail author
Original Article

Abstract

Chemically modified starch (RS4) nanoparticles were synthesized through homogenization and water-in-oil mini-emulsion cross-linking. Homogenization was optimized with regard to z-average diameter by using a three-factor-three-level Box–Behnken design. Homogenization pressure (X1), oil/water ratio (X2), and surfactant (X3) were selected as independent variables, whereas z-average diameter was considered as a dependent variable. The following optimum preparation conditions were obtained to achieve the minimum average size of these nanoparticles: 50 MPa homogenization pressure, 10:1 oil/water ratio, and 2 g surfactant amount, when the predicted z-average diameter was 303.6 nm. The physicochemical properties of these nanoparticles were also determined. Dynamic light scattering experiments revealed that RS4 nanoparticles measuring a PdI of 0.380 and an average size of approximately 300 nm, which was very close to the predicted z-average diameter (303.6 nm). The absolute value of zeta potential of RS4 nanoparticles (39.7 mV) was higher than RS4 (32.4 mV), with strengthened swelling power. X-ray diffraction results revealed that homogenization induced a disruption in crystalline structure of RS4 nanoparticles led to amorphous or low-crystallinity. Results of stability analysis showed that RS4 nanosuspensions (particle size) had good stability at 30 °C over 24 h.

Keywords

Homogenization Mini-emulsion cross-linking Box–Behnken design RS4 nanoparticle Physicochemical properties 

Notes

Acknowledgements

This work was supported by the Fundamental Research Funds for the Central Universities under Grants No. XDJK2017D124.

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Copyright information

© Association of Food Scientists & Technologists (India) 2017

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.College of Food ScienceSouthwest UniversityChongqingPeople’s Republic of China
  2. 2.Laboratory of Quality and Safety Risk Assessment for Agro-products on Storage and Preservation (Chongqing)Ministry of AgricultureChongqingPeople’s Republic of China

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