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Assessment of chemical and sensory quality of sugarcane alcoholic fermented beverage

Abstract

This study aimed to verify the technological feasibility, chemical quality and sensory acceptance of alcoholic fermented beverage obtained from sugarcane juice. A completely randomized design was applied. Sugar and alcohol content, phenolic (HPLC–MS) and volatile (GS–MS) compounds, pH, density, dry matter and acidity of the fermented beverage of sugarcane were quantified, as well as the acceptance of the product was carried out. The complete fermentation of sugarcane lasted 7 days, and it was obtained an alcohol content of 8.0% v/v. Titrable acidity of the beverage was of 67.31 meq L−1, pH 4.03, soluble solids of 5 °Brix, reducing sugar of 0.07 g glucose 100 g−1, density of 0.991 g cm−3, reduced dry matter of 14.15 g L−1, sulfates lower than 0.7 g K2SO4 L−1. Various phenolic compounds, among which, gallic acid (10.97%), catechin (1.73%), chlorogenic acid (3.52%), caffeic acid (1.49%), vanillic acid (0.28%), p-coumaric acid (0.24%), ferulic acid (6.63%), m-coumaric acid (0.36%), and o-coumaric acid (0.04%). Amongst aromatic compounds, were found mainly esters with fruity aromas (ethyl ester hexanoic acid and ethyl ester octanoic acid). The sugarcane juice can be commercialized as an alternative wine, as it presented adequate features to an alcoholic fermented beverage and was sensory accepted by consumers.

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Acknowledgements

The authors appreciate the financial support by the Federal University of Goiás and Federal University of Lavras.

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Correspondence to Érica Resende Oliveira.

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Resende Oliveira, É., Caliari, M., Soares Soares Júnior, M. et al. Assessment of chemical and sensory quality of sugarcane alcoholic fermented beverage. J Food Sci Technol 55, 72–81 (2018). https://doi.org/10.1007/s13197-017-2792-4

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Keywords

  • Saccharum sp.
  • Fermentation
  • Volatile
  • Phenolic
  • Antioxidant activity