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Chickpeas suppress postprandial blood glucose concentration, and appetite and reduce energy intake at the next meal

Abstract

The current study was designed to explore the beneficial properties of chickpeas consumption on suppressing appetite, excessive blood glucose excursions, and energy intake (EI) from a subsequent meal. Two caloric preloaded foods, chickpeas, and white bread were compared to water control, fed to healthy female subjects at equal energy density, volume, and available carbohydrate content in two experiments spanning over 60 and 120 min. Blood glucose was measured by a portable glucometer and satiety by using a visual analogue scale questionnaire at baseline and every 15 up to 60 min in both experiments and then every 30 until 120 min in Experiment 2 after the preloads ingestion. A test meal was served at the end of both experiments to calculate EI and percent energy compensation (%EC). The results suggest a reduction of 29–36% in blood glucose concentration, and 83–98% EC after the chickpeas in Experiments 1 and 2 respectively compared to white bread. The average appetite showed a positive association with EI. We conclude that the consumption of chickpeas is beneficial on glycemic control and may help in body weight management through suppressing appetite and energy intake.

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Acknowledgements

This research was conducted with the support of a Grant approved by the Kuwait University Research Sector, Grant # WF04/07.

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Correspondence to Tasleem A. Zafar.

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Zafar, T.A., Kabir, Y. Chickpeas suppress postprandial blood glucose concentration, and appetite and reduce energy intake at the next meal. J Food Sci Technol 54, 987–994 (2017). https://doi.org/10.1007/s13197-016-2422-6

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  • DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/s13197-016-2422-6

Keywords

  • Chickpeas
  • Appetite
  • Glycemic control
  • Energy compensation