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Antioxidant activities and phenolic contents of three red seaweeds (Division: Rhodophyta) harvested from the Gulf of Mannar of Peninsular India

Abstract

The antioxidant activities of methanol extract and its solvent fractions (n-hexane, dichloromethane and ethyl acetate) of three red seaweeds (Hypnea musciformis, H. valentiae, and Jania rubens) collected from the Gulf of Mannar of South eastern coast of India were evaluated, using different in vitro systems, viz., DPPH, ABTS, HO radical scavenging activities, H2O2 scavenging ability, Fe2+ ion chelating ability and reducing potential. Folin–Ciocalteu method was used to determine the total phenolic content of the extracts/fractions, and the results were expressed as mg of gallic acid equivalent (GAE)/g of the seaweed extracts/fractions. Thiobarbituric acid-reactive substances (TBARS) inhibition assay was employed to assess the ability of the seaweed extracts/fractions to inhibit lipid oxidation. Ethyl acetate (EtOAc) fractions of H. musciformis exhibited significantly higher total phenolic content (205.5 mg GAE/g), DPPH· scavenging activity (IC50 0.6 mg/mL), ABTS.+ scavenging activity (IC50 0.51 μg/mL), Fe2+ chelating ability (IC50 0.70 mg/mL), H2O2 scavenging activity (IC50 0.39 mg/mL), reducing ability (Abs700 nm 1.46) and lipid peroxidation inhibitory ability (2.71 MDAEC/kg) (P < 0.05) compared to its n-hexane, DCM fractions, crude MeOH extract and MeOH extracts/fractions of H. valentiae and J. rubens. DCM fraction of J. rubens showed significantly higher hydroxyl radical scavenging activity (IC50 0.55 mg/mL) compared with H. musciformis and H. valentiae (P < 0.05). This study indicated the potential use of red seaweeds, in particular, H. musciformis as candidate species to be used as food supplement for increasing the shelf-life of food industry, and candidates in combating carcinogenesis and inflammatory diseases.

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Acknowledgments

This work is supported by the funding under the Science and Engineering Research Council (SERC) Scheme (SR/S0/HS-0124/2012 SERB) from Department of Science and Technology, New Delhi, India. The authors thank the Director, Central Marine Fisheries Research Institute for his valuable guidance and support. Thanks are due to the Head, Marine Biotechnology Division, Central Marine Fisheries Research Institute for facilitating the research activity.

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The authors declare that they have no conflict of interest including any financial, personal or other relationships with other people or organizations that could inappropriately influence, or be perceived to influence, the present work.

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Correspondence to Kajal Chakraborty.

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Chakraborty, K., Joseph, D. & Praveen, N.K. Antioxidant activities and phenolic contents of three red seaweeds (Division: Rhodophyta) harvested from the Gulf of Mannar of Peninsular India. J Food Sci Technol 52, 1924–1935 (2015). https://doi.org/10.1007/s13197-013-1189-2

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  • DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/s13197-013-1189-2

Keywords

  • Antioxidant activity
  • Red seaweeds
  • Hypnea sp
  • Jania rubens
  • Phenolics
  • Lipid peroxidation