Evaporative cooling system for storage of fruits and vegetables - a review

Abstract

Horticultural produce are stored at lower temperature because of their highly perishable nature. There are many methods to cool the environment. Hence, preserving these types of foods in their fresh form demands that the chemical, bio-chemical and physiological changes are restricted to a minimum by close control of space temperature and humidity. The high cost involved in developing cold storage or controlled atmosphere storage is a pressing problem in several developing countries. Evaporative cooling is a well-known system to be an efficient and economical means for reducing the temperature and increasing the relative humidity in an enclosure and this effect has been extensively tried for increasing the shelf life of horticultural produce in some tropical and subtropical countries. In this review paper, basic concept and principle, methods of evaporative cooling and their application for the preservation of fruits and vegetables and economy are also reported. Thus, the evaporative cooler has prospect for use for short term preservation of vegetables and fruits soon after harvest. Zero energy cooling system could be used effectively for short-duration storage of fruits and vegetables even in hilly region. It not only reduces the storage temperature but also increases the relative humidity of the storage which is essential for maintaining the freshness of the commodities.

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Correspondence to Amrat lal Basediya.

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lal Basediya, A., Samuel, D.V.K. & Beera, V. Evaporative cooling system for storage of fruits and vegetables - a review. J Food Sci Technol 50, 429–442 (2013). https://doi.org/10.1007/s13197-011-0311-6

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Keywords

  • Evaporative cooling system
  • Storage conditions
  • Factors affecting
  • Design consideration
  • Economy
  • Merits & demerits