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Quality of Information Available on YouTube Videos Pertaining to Thyroid Cancer

Abstract

The purpose of the present study was to assess the quality of information available on YouTube videos pertaining to thyroid cancer. A search of YouTube (http://www.youtube.com) was performed on February 12, 2018, using the search terms “thyroid cancer” and “thyroid cancer treatment.” The first 50 videos that appeared on each search were reviewed and 52 videos were included in the analysis. Videos were independently analyzed by two authors for video characteristics including publishing source of upload, continent of origin, presence of animation, and numbers of views, likes, and dislikes. The quality of information provided was assessed using the DISCERN and JAMA benchmark scores, while video power index was also calculated. The median (min-max) DISCERN score was 19.5 (4–71) for reviewer 1 and 20.0 (4–72) for reviewer 2. The median (min-max) JAMA benchmark score was 2.0 (1–4) for both reviewers. JAMA scores were positively correlated with video power index in both reviewer 1 (r = 0.310, p = 0.025) and reviewer 2 (r = 0.356, p = 0.010) assessment. JAMA and DISCERN scores were positively correlated with duration of videos in both reviewer 1 (r = 0.454, p = 0.001 and r = 0.533, p < 0.001, respectively) and reviewer 2 (r = 0.541, p < 0.001 and r = 0.519, p < 0.001, respectively) assessment. In conclusion, our findings revealed poor quality of information provided by YouTube videos pertaining to thyroid cancer based on DISCERN and JAWA scores. Videos with longer duration and higher video power index seem to be associated with higher quality scores, whereas no impact of using animation was shown on quality scores as well as no association between video duration and video power index.

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Correspondence to Mehmet Akif Aydin.

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Aydin, M.A., Akyol, H. Quality of Information Available on YouTube Videos Pertaining to Thyroid Cancer. J Canc Educ 35, 599–605 (2020). https://doi.org/10.1007/s13187-019-01502-9

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  • DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/s13187-019-01502-9

Keywords

  • Thyroid cancer
  • YouTube videos
  • Health information
  • Quality
  • DISCERN score
  • JAWA scores