Patterns of Bullying in Single-Sex Schools

Abstract

This study explores how the relationship between students’ risk of being bullied and their gender conformity differs depending on whether they attend single-sex or coeducational high schools. Findings indicate that gender nonconforming students, and students who vary from their dominant school gender norms, are most likely to experience bullying regardless of school context. Single-sex schools emerge as a protective factor for gender nonconforming females, possibly due to a privileged position female masculinity holds in a single-sex female context. These findings contribute to a complicated terrain emerging in the research literature on single-sex schools.

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Correspondence to Billie Gastic.

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Johnson, D., Gastic, B. Patterns of Bullying in Single-Sex Schools. Sex Res Soc Policy 11, 126–136 (2014). https://doi.org/10.1007/s13178-014-0146-9

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Keywords

  • Single-sex schools
  • Bullying
  • Gender
  • Educational policy