Translational Behavioral Medicine

, Volume 7, Issue 2, pp 224–232

Choosing between responsive-design websites versus mobile apps for your mobile behavioral intervention: presenting four case studies

  • Gabrielle M. Turner-McGrievy
  • Sarah B. Hales
  • Danielle E. Schoffman
  • Homay Valafar
  • Keith Brazendale
  • R. Glenn Weaver
  • Michael W. Beets
  • Michael D. Wirth
  • Nitin Shivappa
  • Trisha Mandes
  • James R. Hébert
  • Sara Wilcox
  • Andrew Hester
  • Matthew J. McGrievy
Case Study

Abstract

Both mobile apps and responsive-design websites (web apps) can be used to deliver mobile health (mHealth) interventions, but it can be difficult to discern which to use in research. The goal of this paper is to present four case studies from behavioral interventions that developed either a mobile app or a web app for research and present an information table to help researchers determine which mobile option would work best for them. Four behavioral intervention case studies (two developed a mobile app, and two developed a web app) presented include time, cost, and expertise. Considerations for adopting a mobile app or a web app—such as time, cost, access to programmers, data collection, security needs, and intervention components— are presented. Future studies will likely integrate both mobile app and web app modalities. The considerations presented here can help guide researchers on which platforms to choose prior to starting an mHealth intervention.

Keywords

mHealth Interventions Mobile apps Websites Study design Health behavior 

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Copyright information

© Society of Behavioral Medicine 2016

Authors and Affiliations

  • Gabrielle M. Turner-McGrievy
    • 1
  • Sarah B. Hales
    • 1
  • Danielle E. Schoffman
    • 1
  • Homay Valafar
    • 2
  • Keith Brazendale
    • 3
  • R. Glenn Weaver
    • 3
  • Michael W. Beets
    • 3
  • Michael D. Wirth
    • 4
    • 5
    • 6
  • Nitin Shivappa
    • 5
    • 6
  • Trisha Mandes
    • 1
  • James R. Hébert
    • 4
    • 5
    • 6
  • Sara Wilcox
    • 3
    • 7
  • Andrew Hester
    • 8
  • Matthew J. McGrievy
    • 8
  1. 1.Arnold School of Public Health, Department of Health Promotion, Education, and BehaviorUniversity of South CarolinaColumbiaUSA
  2. 2.College of Computer Science and Engineering, Swearingen Engineering CenterUniversity of South CarolinaColumbiaUSA
  3. 3.Arnold School of Public Health, Department of Exercise ScienceUniversity of South CarolinaColumbiaUSA
  4. 4.Arnold School of Public Health, Department of Epidemiology and BiostatisticsUniversity of South CarolinaColumbiaUSA
  5. 5.Arnold School of Public Health, Cancer Prevention and Control ProgramUniversity of South CarolinaColumbiaUSA
  6. 6.Connecting Health Innovations, LLCColumbiaUSA
  7. 7.Arnold School of Public Health, Prevention Research CenterUniversity of South CarolinaColumbiaUSA
  8. 8.Arnold School of Public Health, Web and Communications CoreUniversity of South CarolinaColumbiaUSA

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