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Translational Behavioral Medicine

, Volume 6, Issue 4, pp 669–671 | Cite as

Society of Behavioral Medicine supports implementation of high quality lung cancer screening in high-risk populations

  • Karriem S. WatsonEmail author
  • Amanda C. Blok
  • Joanna Buscemi
  • Yamile Molina
  • Marian Fitzgibbon
  • Melissa A. Simon
  • Lance Williams
  • Kameron Matthews
  • Jamie L. Studts
  • Sarah E. Lillie
  • Jamie S. Ostroff
  • Lisa Carter-Harris
  • Robert A. Winn
Original Research

Abstract

The Society of Behavioral Medicine (SBM) supports the United States Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF) recommendation of low-dose computed tomography (LDCT) screening of the chest for eligible populations to reduce lung cancer mortality. Consistent with efforts to translate research findings into real-world settings, SBM encourages health-care providers and health-care systems to (1) integrate evidence-based tobacco treatment as an essential component of LDCT-based lung cancer screening, (2) examine the structural barriers that may impact screening uptake, and (3) incorporate shared decision-making as a clinical platform to facilitate consultations and engagement with individuals at high risk for lung cancer about the potential benefits and harms associated with participation in a lung cancer screening program. We advise policy makers and legislators to support screening in high-risk populations by continuing to (1) expand access to high quality LDCT-based screening among underserved high-risk populations, (2) enhance cost-effectiveness by integrating evidence-based tobacco treatments into screening in high-risk populations, and (3) increase funding for research that explores implementation science and increased public awareness and access of diverse populations to participate in clinical and translational research.

Keywords

Lung cancer Screening Shared decision-making Policy 

Notes

Acknowledgment

This manuscript was supported, in part, by the National Institutes of Health’s National Cancer Institute, Grant Numbers U54CA202995, U54CA202997, U54CA203000, and R21 CA173880. This manuscript was also supported in part by the Kentucky Lung Cancer Research Program P02 415 1400004000 and Bristol-Myers Squibb Foundation. The content is solely the responsibility of the authors and does not necessarily represent the official views of the National Institutes of Health, the Kentucky Lung Cancer Research Program nor Bristol-Myers Squibb Foundation. The authors wish to gratefully acknowledge the expert review provided by the Society of Behavioral Medicine’s Health Policy Committee, the Cancer Special Interest Group, and the Health Decision Making Special Interest Group.

Compliance with ethical standards

Author disclosures

The findings reported have not been previously published and the manuscript is not being simultaneously submitted elsewhere.

Information in the article was previously reported to the Society of Behavioral Medicine (SBM). The authors have full control of all primary data and they agree to allow the journal to review the data if requested. The acknowledgement section indicates all funding sources that support in part the information in the manuscript. There are no conflicts of interest to report. The manuscript does not contain any information that would violate human rights nor does the manuscript have any impact on the welfare of animals. No IRB approval was required nor was informed consent required as the manuscript does not contact any information collected from human subject research. This manuscript does not violate the ethical standards of the declaration of Helsinki as it does not involve any human subjects research.

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Copyright information

© Society of Behavioral Medicine 2016

Authors and Affiliations

  • Karriem S. Watson
    • 1
    • 2
    • 3
    Email author
  • Amanda C. Blok
    • 4
  • Joanna Buscemi
    • 1
    • 2
  • Yamile Molina
    • 1
    • 2
    • 3
    • 5
  • Marian Fitzgibbon
    • 1
    • 2
  • Melissa A. Simon
    • 6
    • 7
  • Lance Williams
    • 8
  • Kameron Matthews
    • 1
    • 2
    • 3
  • Jamie L. Studts
    • 9
  • Sarah E. Lillie
    • 10
  • Jamie S. Ostroff
    • 11
  • Lisa Carter-Harris
    • 12
  • Robert A. Winn
    • 1
    • 2
    • 3
  1. 1.University of Illinois Cancer CenterChicagoUSA
  2. 2.University of Illinois at ChicagoChicagoUSA
  3. 3.University of Illinois Hospital & Health Sciences System Mile Square Health CenterChicagoUSA
  4. 4.University of Massachusetts Medical SchoolWorcesterUSA
  5. 5.Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research CenterSeattleUSA
  6. 6.Northwestern University Feinberg School of MedicineChicagoUSA
  7. 7.Robert H. Lurie Comprehensive Cancer CenterChicagoUSA
  8. 8.Northeastern Illinois UniversityChicagoUSA
  9. 9.University of Kentucky College of MedicineLexingtonUSA
  10. 10.Minneapolis Veterans Affairs HospitalMinneapolisUSA
  11. 11.Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer CenterNew York CityUSA
  12. 12.Indiana University School of NursingIndianapolisUSA

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