Translational Behavioral Medicine

, Volume 4, Issue 3, pp 314–323

Obesity in social media: a mixed methods analysis

  • Wen-ying Sylvia Chou
  • Abby Prestin
  • Stephen Kunath
Original Research

DOI: 10.1007/s13142-014-0256-1

Cite this article as:
Chou, W.S., Prestin, A. & Kunath, S. Behav. Med. Pract. Policy Res. (2014) 4: 314. doi:10.1007/s13142-014-0256-1

Abstract

The escalating obesity rate in the USA has made obesity prevention a top public health priority. Recent interventions have tapped into the social media (SM) landscape. To leverage SM in obesity prevention, we must understand user-generated discourse surrounding the topic. This study was conducted to describe SM interactions about weight through a mixed methods analysis. Data were collected across 60 days through SM monitoring services, yielding 2.2 million posts. Data were cleaned and coded through Natural Language Processing (NLP) techniques, yielding popular themes and the most retweeted content. Qualitative analyses of selected posts add insight into the nature of the public dialogue and motivations for participation. Twitter represented the most common channel. Twitter and Facebook were dominated by derogatory and misogynist sentiment, pointing to weight stigmatization, whereas blogs and forums contained more nuanced comments. Other themes included humor, education, and positive sentiment countering weight-based stereotypes. This study documented weight-related attitudes and perceptions. This knowledge will inform public health/obesity prevention practice.

Keywords

Obesity Weight stigma Cyber aggression Social media Health communication Mixed methods Online social support 

Copyright information

© Society of Behavioral Medicine 2014

Authors and Affiliations

  • Wen-ying Sylvia Chou
    • 1
  • Abby Prestin
    • 2
  • Stephen Kunath
    • 3
  1. 1.Health Communication and Informatics Research Branch, Behavioral Research Program, Division of Cancer Control and Population SciencesNational Cancer Institute, National Institutes of HealthRockvilleUSA
  2. 2.Health Communication and Informatics Research Branch, Behavioral Research Program, Division of Cancer Control and Population SciencesNational Cancer Institute, National Institutes of HealthRockvilleUSA
  3. 3.Department of LinguisticsGeorgetown UniversityRockvilleUSA

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