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Acta Oceanologica Sinica

, Volume 36, Issue 5, pp 73–82 | Cite as

The September 16, 2015 M w 8.3 Illapel, Chile Earthquake: characteristics of tsunami wave from near-field to far-field

  • Zhiyuan Ren
  • Ye Yuan
  • Peitao Wang
  • Tingting Fan
  • Juncheng Wang
  • Jingming Hou
Article

Abstract

On September 16, 2015, an earthquake with magnitude of M w 8.3 occurred 46 km offshore from Illapel, Chile, generating a 4.4-m local tsunami measured at Coquimbo. In this study, the characteristics of tsunami are presented by a combination of analysis of observations and numerical simulation based on sources of USGS and NOAA. The records of 16 DART buoys in deep water, ten tidal gauges along coasts of near-field, and ten coastal gauges in the far-field are studied by applying Fourier analyses. The numerical simulation based on nonlinear shallow water equations and nested grids is carried out to provide overall tsunami propagation scenarios, and the results match well with the observations in deep water and but not well in coasts closed to the epicenter. Due to the short distance to the epicenter and the shelf resonance of southern Peru and Chile, the maximum amplitude ranged from 0.1 m to 2 m, except for Coquimbo. In deep water, the maximum amplitude of buoys decayed from 9.8 cm to 0.8 cm, suggesting a centimeter-scale Pacific-wide tsunami, while the governing period was 13–17 min and 32 min. Whereas in the far-field coastal region, the tsunami wave amplified to be around 0.2 m to 0.8 m, mostly as a result of run-up effect and resonance from coast reflection. Although the tsunami was relatively moderate in deep water, it still produced non-negligible tsunami hazards in local region and the coasts of farfield.

Key words

2015 Illapel earthquake tsunami observation numerical modeling far-field near-field 

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Notes

Acknowledgements

Special thanks to Liu Hua at Shanghai Jiao Tong University and Christopher Earls Brennen at Caltech for their encouragement and suggestion on my research work. The valuable comments from the reviewers enhanced this study.

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Copyright information

© The Chinese Society of Oceanography and Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2017

Authors and Affiliations

  • Zhiyuan Ren
    • 1
  • Ye Yuan
    • 1
  • Peitao Wang
    • 1
  • Tingting Fan
    • 1
  • Juncheng Wang
    • 1
  • Jingming Hou
    • 1
  1. 1.National Marine Environmental Forecasting CenterBeijingChina

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