Evolutionary impact of whole genome duplication in Poaceae family

Abstract

Whole genome duplication (WGD) is a common phenomenon in plants, inducing species diversity, promoting speciation, and playing an important role in providing new genetic material in plant evolution. So far, numerous new gene functions such as pseudogenization, neofunctionalization, and subfunctionalization have evolved through WGD. WGD has occurred several times during the evolution of angiosperms over the past 200 million years. Poaceae, one of the largest plant families in the angiosperms, is considered one of the most economically important and ecologically successful plants, with approximately 600 genera and 10,000 species. Many genetic studies have been conducted on these plants. However, study of the most active phylogeny in the Poaceae family study has not yet been completed. Through comparative studies of major Poaceae groups, this review focuses on the effects of genome duplication in the Poaceae family on its evolutionary history and the changes in chromosome numbers.

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Acknowledgements

This work was supported by the “Cooperative Research Program for Agriculture Science and Technology Development (Project No. PJ01315902)”, Rural Development Administration, Republic of Korea.

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Lee, S., Choi, S., Jeon, D. et al. Evolutionary impact of whole genome duplication in Poaceae family. J. Crop Sci. Biotechnol. (2020). https://doi.org/10.1007/s12892-020-00049-2

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Keywords

  • Polyplodizatio
  • Whole genome duplication
  • Grass family
  • Domestication
  • Evolution