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Conservation Genetics Resources

, Volume 10, Issue 2, pp 195–199 | Cite as

The complete mitochondrial genome of Kele pig (Sus scrofa) using next-generation deep sequencing

  • Ya Tan
  • Kai-zhi Shi
  • Jing Wang
  • Chun-lin Du
  • Chun-ping Zhao
  • Xiong Zhang
  • Li Zhu
  • Yi-shun Shang
Technical Note

Abstract

Kele pig (Sus scrofa), a semi-captive native breed in the Southwest of China, have a range of light to dark brown shades phenotype, just like the coat color of Duroc in some way, and also are well known for their good meat quality. However, Kele pigs decreased dramatically in recent years. The first complete mitochondrial genome of Kele pig was sequenced by next-generation sequencing in order to develop the mitogenome data for genus S. scrofa. The total length of the mitogenome is 16,828 bp, which contains 1 control region, 2 ribosomal RNA genes, 13 protein-coding genes and 22 transfer RNA genes. Phylogenetic analyses based on the complete sequences from several breeds were analyzed by neighbor-joining methods and showed that Kele pigs have closer relationships with domestic pigs in southwest region of China. These results are useful for pig phylogenetic study and evolution study of pig genomes.

Keywords

Kele pig Mitochondrial genome Deep sequencing 

Notes

Acknowledgements

This research was supported by grants from Guizhou Provincial Department of Science and Technology (Nos. 20154003 and NY20133072) and Modern Swine Industrial Technology System of Guizhou Province (No. GZCYTX2013).

Compliance with ethical standards

Conflict of interest

The authors declare that they have no conflict of interest.

Ethical approval

The animal experiment in the study was conducted according to the Chinese Ministry of Science and Technology Guiding Directives for Humane Treatment of Laboratory Animals.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media B.V. 2017

Authors and Affiliations

  • Ya Tan
    • 1
    • 2
  • Kai-zhi Shi
    • 1
  • Jing Wang
    • 1
  • Chun-lin Du
    • 1
  • Chun-ping Zhao
    • 1
  • Xiong Zhang
    • 1
  • Li Zhu
    • 2
  • Yi-shun Shang
    • 1
  1. 1.Institute of Animal Husbandry and VeterinaryGuizhou Academy of Agricultural ScienceGuiyangChina
  2. 2.College of Animal Science and TechnologySichuan Agricultural UniversityChengduChina

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