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Conservation Genetics Resources

, Volume 10, Issue 1, pp 51–54 | Cite as

The complete chloroplast genome of Sinojackia xylocarpa (Ericales: Styracaceae), an endangered plant species endemic to China

  • Ling-Li Wang
  • Yu Zhang
  • Yan-Ci Yang
  • Xiao-Min Du
  • Xiao-Long Ren
  • Wen-Zhe Liu
Technical Note

Abstract

Sinojackia xylocarpa is an endangered plant species endemic to China. Here, we assembled its complete chloroplast genome from Illumina sequencing reads. The circular genome is 158,725 bp long, and contains a pair of inverted repeat regions of 26,090 bp each, a large single-copy region of 87,994 bp and a small single-copy region of 18,551 bp. It encodes 137 genes, including 91 protein-coding genes (82 PCG species), 38 tRNA genes (31 tRNA species) and eight rRNA genes (four rRNA species). Fifteen gene species harbor a single intron, while another two gene species have a couple of introns. The base composition is asymmetric (31.1% A, 19.0% C, 18.2% G & 31.7% T) with an overall A+T content of 62.8%. Phylogenetic analysis corroborated the traditional family-level taxonomy of the order Ericales, and suggested that S. xylocarpa is closely related to Alniphyllum eberhardtii and Bruinsmia polysperma within the family Styracaceae.

Keywords

Sinojackia xylocarpa Illumina sequencing Chloroplast genome MITObim 

Notes

Acknowledgements

This study was financially supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (31270428).

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media Dordrecht 2017

Authors and Affiliations

  • Ling-Li Wang
    • 1
    • 2
  • Yu Zhang
    • 3
  • Yan-Ci Yang
    • 1
  • Xiao-Min Du
    • 1
  • Xiao-Long Ren
    • 1
  • Wen-Zhe Liu
    • 1
  1. 1.College of Life SciencesNorthwest UniversityXi’anPeople’s Republic of China
  2. 2.Department of Life SciencesYuncheng UniversityYunchengPeople’s Republic of China
  3. 3.College of Life SciencesShaanxi Normal UniversityXi’anPeople’s Republic of China

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