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Conservation Genetics Resources

, Volume 8, Issue 3, pp 207–209 | Cite as

Sex identification of the masked palm civet (Paguma larvata) using noninvasive hair samples

  • Dan Zhang
  • Mengyin Xiong
  • Hongliang Bu
  • Dajun Wang
  • Sheng Li
  • Meng Yao
  • Rongjiang Wang
Technical Note

Abstract

The masked palm civet (Paguma larvata) is one of the most common mesocarnivores in the mountain ecosystem of Southwest China, where mesocarnivores may play critical roles due to loss of apex predators. Given their elusive nature, genetic analysis based on noninvasive survey techniques is a promising approach to determine the population dynamics and ecological functions of masked palm civets. Here we describe a method for molecular sex identification of masked palm civets. Two pairs of primers were designed to amplify fragments of zfx and sry genes, respectively. Through PCR amplification, the expected fragments, two (123 and 244 bp) in males and one (123 bp) in females, were successfully obtained in 8 sex-known hair samples. The procedures we developed here represent a reliable method for sex identification of masked palm civets.

Keywords

Masked palm civet Sex identification zfx gene sry gene Noninvasive sampling 

Notes

Acknowledgments

This study was funded by The Nature Conservancy China and the Sichuan Nature Conservation Foundation. We are grateful to Yanping Lu from Beijing Zoo and the field staff of Laohegou Nature Reserve for sample collection.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media Dordrecht 2016

Authors and Affiliations

  • Dan Zhang
    • 1
  • Mengyin Xiong
    • 1
  • Hongliang Bu
    • 1
  • Dajun Wang
    • 1
  • Sheng Li
    • 1
  • Meng Yao
    • 1
  • Rongjiang Wang
    • 1
  1. 1.School of Life SciencesPeking UniversityBeijingChina

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