Conservation Genetics Resources

, Volume 4, Issue 4, pp 927–929 | Cite as

Microsatellite markers for Longfin Dace, Agosia chrysogaster, a sentinel fish species in imperiled arid-land rivers of the Sonoran Desert

  • Jesse D. Trujillo
  • Tyler J. Pilger
  • Marlis R. Douglas
  • Michael E. Douglas
  • Thomas F. Turner
Technical Note

Abstract

We isolated and characterized 16 microsatellite DNA loci in Longfin Dace, Agosia chrysogaster, a minnow native to Sonoran Desert streams (southwestern US and northwestern Mexico). After optimization, all primer pairs produced consistently scorable products. Genetic diversity metrics were determined for each locus using 50 individuals from two populations in the Gila River basin, New Mexico. Allelic richness ranged from 2 to 37 and observed heterozygosity ranged from 0.08 to 0.95 across loci. These microsatellites offer a powerful tool to study effects of habitat fragmentation, dewatering, and climate change on population connectivity and genetic diversity in this species. Moreover, Longfin Dace co-occurs with more geographically restricted and endangered desert fish species. Genetic information for Longfin Dace could provide an important comparative dataset to assist conservation and management of other imperiled fishes in the region.

Keywords

Desert fishes Fragmentation Climate change Population structure Cyprinidae 

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media B.V. 2012

Authors and Affiliations

  • Jesse D. Trujillo
    • 1
  • Tyler J. Pilger
    • 1
  • Marlis R. Douglas
    • 2
    • 3
  • Michael E. Douglas
    • 2
    • 3
  • Thomas F. Turner
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Biology and Museum of Southwestern BiologyUniversity of New MexicoAlbuquerqueUSA
  2. 2.Department of BiologyUniversity of ArkansasFayettevilleUSA
  3. 3.Illinois Natural History Survey - Prairie Research InstituteUniversity of IllinoisChampaignUSA

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