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Conservation Genetics Resources

, Volume 2, Supplement 1, pp 65–67 | Cite as

Development of eight polymorphic microsatellite markers by FIASCO-based strategy for a arsenic-hyperaccumulator Chinese brake fern

  • B. Yang
  • M. Hu
  • M. Zhou
  • J. P. Guan
  • J. Zhang
  • C. Y. Lan
  • B. LiaoEmail author
Technical Note

Abstract

Chinese Brake fern (Pteris vittata) is the first identified and well-known arsenic-hyperaccumulator. It is widely distributed in areas of temperate zone as diploid and of subtropics-tropics zone as tetraploid. Screening 60 individuals from Southern China, eight polymorphic microsatellite markers were developed for the first time by employing fast isolation by AFLP of sequences containing repeats protocol (FIASCO). The number of alleles for each marker ranged from two to seven and one to four bands per individual. Furthermore, five of the loci possess more than two alleles per individual. The results suggested these microsatellite markers provide a useful tool for studying the ongoing genetic variability of this specie as well as mating systems.

Keywords

FIASCO Microsatellite markers Pteris vittata Polymorphism 

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media B.V. 2010

Authors and Affiliations

  • B. Yang
    • 1
  • M. Hu
    • 1
  • M. Zhou
    • 1
  • J. P. Guan
    • 1
  • J. Zhang
    • 2
  • C. Y. Lan
    • 1
  • B. Liao
    • 1
    Email author
  1. 1.State Key Laboratory of Biocontrol, School of Life SciencesSun Yat-Sen UniversityGuangzhouPeople’s Republic of China
  2. 2.School of Life Science & BiopharmacologyGuangdong Pharmaceutical UniversityGuangzhouPeople’s Republic of China

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