Mindfulness

, Volume 4, Issue 2, pp 158–167 | Cite as

Mindfulness-Based Treatment of Aggression in Individuals with Mild Intellectual Disabilities: A Waiting List Control Study

  • Nirbhay N. Singh
  • Giulio E. Lancioni
  • Bryan T. Karazsia
  • Alan S. W. Winton
  • Rachel E. Myers
  • Ashvind N. A. Singh
  • Angela D. A. Singh
  • Judy Singh
ORIGINAL PAPER

Abstract

Physical and verbal aggression is a significant problem for some individuals with mild intellectual disabilities who reside in the community. We assessed the effectiveness of a mindfulness-based procedure, Meditation on the Soles of the Feet, to control both physical and verbal aggression. The design was a two-group (experimental and waiting list control) randomized controlled trial with four 12-week phases. A total of 57 individuals were referred to the trial, with 34 eligible for random assignment to the experimental and control conditions. Results showed a significant reduction in physical and verbal aggression commensurate with mindfulness-based training, when compared to the waiting list control condition. Similar reductions in physical and verbal aggression were evident when the same training was introduced in the control condition. The results demonstrate the effectiveness of the mindfulness-based procedure for assisting individuals with mild intellectual disabilities to control their physical and verbal aggression.

Keywords

Physical aggression Verbal aggression Meditation on the Soles of the Feet Randomized controlled trial 

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 2012

Authors and Affiliations

  • Nirbhay N. Singh
    • 1
  • Giulio E. Lancioni
    • 3
  • Bryan T. Karazsia
    • 4
  • Alan S. W. Winton
    • 5
  • Rachel E. Myers
    • 6
  • Ashvind N. A. Singh
    • 2
  • Angela D. A. Singh
    • 2
  • Judy Singh
    • 1
  1. 1.ONE Research InstituteRaleighUSA
  2. 2.American Health and Wellness InstituteLong BeachUSA
  3. 3.Department of Neuroscience and Sense OrgansUniversity of BariBariItaly
  4. 4.Department of PsychologyThe College of WoosterWoosterUSA
  5. 5.School of PsychologyMassey UniversityPalmerston NorthNew Zealand
  6. 6.WellStar School of NursingKennesaw State UniversityKennesawUSA

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