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The Short-Term Impact of a Brief Group-Based Mindfulness Therapy Program on Depression and Life Satisfaction

Abstract

The teaching of mindfulness skills is a central component of a number of therapies and has been successful in improving the functioning of individuals suffering from a range of clinical problems. Despite the apparent benefits of mindfulness skills training, most studies to date have targeted clinical samples with the aim of reducing specific symptomatology or general psychological distress. We evaluated a brief (three-session) group-based mindfulness training intervention with a community sample with the aim of enhancing life satisfaction or decreasing psychological distress. In addition, we aimed to determine whether any benefits would be associated with increases on a measure of mindfulness. Results showed that the intervention was successful in decreasing psychological distress and improving life satisfaction and that these benefits were observed in individuals who reported an increase on a measure of mindfulness. Overall, the results suggested that a brief mindfulness intervention can be beneficial for individuals in the community who may not be suffering serious symptoms of psychological distress but are aiming to derive a greater sense of life satisfaction.

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Correspondence to Paul H. Harnett.

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Harnett, P.H., Whittingham, K., Puhakka, E. et al. The Short-Term Impact of a Brief Group-Based Mindfulness Therapy Program on Depression and Life Satisfaction. Mindfulness 1, 183–188 (2010). https://doi.org/10.1007/s12671-010-0024-3

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Keywords

  • Mindfulness
  • Depression
  • Life satisfaction
  • Emotional well-being
  • Group therapy