Application of seismic velocity tomography in investigation of karst collapse hazards, Guangzhou, China

  • Wei Zhao
  • Fuping Gan
  • Yan Meng
  • Zhijie Zheng
  • Xiaoming Liu
Thematic Issue
  • 37 Downloads
Part of the following topical collections:
  1. Karst Hydrogeology: Advances in Karst Collapse Studies

Abstract

This paper describes seismic velocity tomography applied to the investigation and assessment of karst collapse hazards to facilitate accurate characterization of geological conditions of karst sinkhole formation. In the survey areas of Xiamao, Guangzhou, China, and Huangchi, Foshan, China, seismic velocity tomography was used to explore the structures of rock and soil associated with karst collapse. The results show that sand intercalated with clay or clay intercalated with soft soil dominates the cover of these two areas. The overburden is 20–33 m thick and underlain by Carboniferous limestone. In the limestone, there are well-developed karst caves and cracks as well as highly fluctuating bedrock surfaces. The seismic velocities are less than 2500 m/s in the cover, 2500–4500 m/s in the karst fracture zones and caves of Xiamao, and 1500–2000 m/s in the Huangchi collapse area. The karst fracture zones, relief of bedrock surfaces, and variations of soil thicknesses revealed by seismic velocity tomography are well constrained and in agreement with those in the drilling borehole profiles. This paper demonstrates that seismic velocity tomography can delineate anomalies of rock and soil with the advantages of speed, intuitive images, and high resolution.

Keywords

Seismic velocity tomography Low-velocity anomaly cover Karst cave Fractured zone Bedrock surface Karst collapse 

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag GmbH Germany, part of Springer Nature 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  • Wei Zhao
    • 1
    • 2
  • Fuping Gan
    • 1
    • 2
  • Yan Meng
    • 1
    • 2
  • Zhijie Zheng
    • 1
    • 2
  • Xiaoming Liu
    • 3
  1. 1.Institute of Karst GeologyChinese Academy of Geological SciencesGuilinChina
  2. 2.Karst Dynamics LaboratoryML R&GZARGuilinChina
  3. 3.Guangxi Monitoring Center for Geological EnvironmentGuilinChina

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