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Environmental Earth Sciences

, Volume 69, Issue 5, pp 1523–1528 | Cite as

Effects of humic acid and Tween-80 on behavior of decabromodiphenyl ether in soil columns

  • Sheng Yu
  • Peng Zou
  • Wei Zhu
  • Lin Xiao
  • Aijun Miao
  • Lijuan Jiang
  • Xiaolin Wang
  • Jun Wu
  • Liuyan YangEmail author
Original Article

Abstract

The effects of organic matter, humic acid and Tween-80 on decabromodiphenyl ether (BDE-209) behavior in soil columns were investigated. The BDE-209 transport was simulated in 4-cm-length soil columns whether organic matter was added or not. A high concentration of BDE-209 was washed out of the soil column in the presence of 500 mg L−1 of Tween-80 for forming and suspending contaminated soil colloids in more than 4-cm-length ones (especially in 10-cm-length ones). While the humic acid was to facilitate BDE-209 adsorption onto soil particles (like soil colloids), Tween-80 was to enhance BDE-209 movement in porous media. The significant concentration averaged from 0.2 to 0.1 μg L−1 in soil columns of length from 10 to 24 cm with Tween-80 addition by comparing the estimated marginal means (p < 0.05, SPSS). Contrasted with humic acid-binding BDE-209 in soil particles, Tween-80 could carry contaminant soil colloids into deeper layers and even affect the final effluents of 25-cm-length columns. It was visibly presented that the BDE-209 concentration in the effluents was mainly induced by Tween-80. Thus, BDE-209 was carried by soil colloids to transport and pollute longer and wider soil distance with the help of the effective promoters and stabilizers of Tween-80 and humic acid in soil matrix.

Keywords

BDE-209 Tween-80 Humic acid Transport Soil colloid 

Notes

Acknowledgments

This work is funded by National Water Special Program (No. 2012ZX07101006) and National Natural Science Foundation of China (20637030). The authors also thank J.F. Feng for technical assistance.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 2012

Authors and Affiliations

  • Sheng Yu
    • 1
  • Peng Zou
    • 1
  • Wei Zhu
    • 1
  • Lin Xiao
    • 1
  • Aijun Miao
    • 1
  • Lijuan Jiang
    • 1
  • Xiaolin Wang
    • 1
  • Jun Wu
    • 1
  • Liuyan Yang
    • 1
    Email author
  1. 1.State Key Laboratory of Pollution Control and Resource Reuse, School of the EnvironmentNanjing UniversityNanjingPeople’s Republic of China

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