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Parenting Practices, Parenting Style, and Children’s School Achievement

Abstract

This study, drawing on data from the 2002 Survey of Approaches to Educational Planning (SAEP), examined the predictive effects of parenting practices and parenting style on children’s school achievement, and the predictive effects of parental expectations and parental beliefs on parenting style for 6,626 respondents with children aged 5–18 years in Canada. Hierarchical multiple regression analyses, after controlling for family socioeconomic status (SES), revealed the substantial positive predictive effects of family SES, parental encouragement, parental expectations, and parental beliefs on children’s school achievement. In contrast, parental monitoring had a substantial negative predictive effect on children’s school achievement in the context of other variables. Although parental expectations were not related to parenting style, parental beliefs were positively associated with both parental encouragement and parental monitoring—the two dimensions of authoritative parenting style.

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Correspondence to Shaljan Areepattamannil.

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Areepattamannil, S. Parenting Practices, Parenting Style, and Children’s School Achievement. Psychol Stud 55, 283–289 (2010). https://doi.org/10.1007/s12646-010-0043-0

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  • DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/s12646-010-0043-0

Keywords

  • Parenting practices
  • Parenting style
  • School achievement
  • Parental encouragement
  • Parental monitoring
  • Parental expectations
  • Parental beliefs