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Journal of Parasitic Diseases

, Volume 33, Issue 1–2, pp 54–56 | Cite as

Treatment of dairy buffaloes naturally infected with sarcoptic mange

  • Syed Asad Irshad Kazmi
  • Azhar Maqbool
  • Muhammad Tariq Tonio
  • Abeera Naureen
  • Adeela Ajmal
  • Muhammad Tanveer Anwar
Original Article

Abstract

Therapeutic trials of sarcoptic mange in buffaloes were studied at local Livestock farms, Lahore (Pakistan). A total of 600 buffaloes were examined over 1 year period (August 2006 to July 2007) for prevalence study, while 60 buffaloes were selected for therapeutic trial. Sarcoptic mange was recorded in 66 (11%) animals. The highest monthly prevalence was reported during the months of January and February (18%) followed by December and March (16%) whereas lowest during the month of July (2%). Over all highest seasonally prevalence was recorded during winter (16.5%) and lowest during summer (5%). Moreover, highest infestation rate was recorded among young (<3 months) buffaloes than with age >3 months. Sex-wise prevalence indicated more prevalence in buffalo bulls (13.15%) than female buffaloes (9.28%). Therapeutic trials were carried out by using ivermectin, doramectin and trichlorphon as per manufacturer’s recommendations for a period of 10 days, while one group was kept as untreated control. Negative skin scraping, disappearance of gross lesions, stoppage of itching and regrowth of normal hair were taken as the criterion to assess the efficacy of these drugs.

Keywords

Prevalence Efficacy of the drugs Sarcoptic mange Buffaloes 

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Copyright information

© Indian Society for Parasitology 2009

Authors and Affiliations

  • Syed Asad Irshad Kazmi
    • 1
  • Azhar Maqbool
    • 2
  • Muhammad Tariq Tonio
    • 2
  • Abeera Naureen
    • 2
  • Adeela Ajmal
    • 2
  • Muhammad Tanveer Anwar
    • 2
  1. 1.Department of Parasitology, Faculty of Veterinary ScienceAllama Iqbal Open University IslamabadLahorePakistan
  2. 2.Department of Clinical Medicine and SurgeryUniversity of Veterinary and Animal SciencesLahorePakistan

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