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Journal of Parasitic Diseases

, Volume 33, Issue 1–2, pp 23–27 | Cite as

Emergence periodicity of Phlebotomus argentipes annandale and brunetti (Diptera: psychodidae): A laboratory study

  • D. S. Dinesh
  • A. Singh
  • V. Kumar
  • S. Kesari
  • A. J. Kumar
  • K. Kishore
  • S. P. Roy
  • S. K. Bhattacharya
  • P. Das
Original Article

Abstract

Phlebotomus argentipes Annandale and Brunetti (Diptera: Psychodidae) is the vector for visceral leishmaniasis in India. The aspects of its biology such as feeding and man vector contact are associated with emergence periodicity of the adult. Hence, the present study was made to find out the actual emergence period of P. argentipes. Wild caught P. argentipes were confined in the rearing pots inside laboratory. The newly emerged adults were collected at hourly intervals and released in to separate polythene bags and were held at 4°C till death. Sand flies were segregated sex-wise after the death under a microscope. The emergence of adult was observed throughout the day. However, the male preferred dawn emergence and the female the dusk. Two peaks of emergence were found in a day; first one in the morning (0900h) and the second one in the evening (1800h). The ratio of both sexes was found to be about equal. The emergence of adult was found to be 77% out of total eggs laid, which was completed within 7–10 days from the 1st day of emergence under laboratory conditions (25°C to 31°C and 70% to 75% relative humidity). This study has important bearings to find out the actual time for personal protection against biting of sand flies to prevent the transmission of Kala-azar.

Keywords

Sand fly Phlebotomus argentipes Emergence Visceral Leishmaniasis 

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Copyright information

© Indian Society for Parasitology 2009

Authors and Affiliations

  • D. S. Dinesh
    • 1
  • A. Singh
    • 1
  • V. Kumar
    • 1
  • S. Kesari
    • 1
  • A. J. Kumar
    • 1
  • K. Kishore
    • 1
  • S. P. Roy
    • 2
  • S. K. Bhattacharya
    • 1
  • P. Das
    • 1
  1. 1.Division of Vector Biology and Control, Rajendra Memorial ResearchInstitute of Medical Sciences (Indian Council of Medical Research)Agamkuan, PatnaIndia
  2. 2.Post Graduate Department of ZoologyT. M. Bhagalpur UniversityBhagalpurIndia

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