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The Global Biogeochemical Silicon Cycle

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Abstract

Silicon is one of the most important elements in the current age of the anthropocene. It has numerous industrial applications, and supports a high-tech multi-billion Euro industry. Silicon has a fascinating biological and geological cycle, interacting with other globally important biogeochemical cycles. In this review, we bring together both biological and geological aspects of the silicon cycle to provide a general, comprehensive review of the cycling of silicon in the environment. We hope this review will provide inspiration for researchers to study this fascinating element, as well as providing a background environmental context to those interested in silicon.

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Correspondence to Eric Struyf.

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Struyf, E., Smis, A., Van Damme, S. et al. The Global Biogeochemical Silicon Cycle. Silicon 1, 207–213 (2009). https://doi.org/10.1007/s12633-010-9035-x

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