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Current Attention Disorders Reports

, Volume 1, Issue 1, pp 42–49 | Cite as

A clinical review of outcomes of the Multimodal treatment study of children with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (MTA)

  • Desiree W. MurrayEmail author
  • L. Eugene Arnold
  • Jim Swanson
  • Karen Wells
  • Karen Burns
  • Peter Jensen
  • Lily Hechtman
  • Natalya Paykina
  • Lauren Legato
  • Tara Strauss
Article

Abstract

Over the past decade, the Multimodal Treatment Study of Children with Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder has provided a bewildering wealth of data (more than 70 peer-reviewed articles) addressing treatment-related questions for children with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder. However, the take-home messages for clinicians may not always be clear. Therefore, this article reviews key findings, including relative benefits of medication and behavioral treatments, long-term effects at 2 and 3 years, treatment mediators and moderators, preliminary delinquency and substance use outcomes, and growth suppression related to stimulant use. Appropriate interpretations of the findings and their limitations are discussed, and recommendations for clinical practice are derived.

Keywords

Stimulant Medication Acad Child Adolesc Psychiatry Multimodal Treatment Study Clin Child Psychol Clin Child Adolesc Psychol 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Current Medicine Group, LLC 2009

Authors and Affiliations

  • Desiree W. Murray
    • 1
    Email author
  • L. Eugene Arnold
  • Jim Swanson
  • Karen Wells
  • Karen Burns
  • Peter Jensen
  • Lily Hechtman
  • Natalya Paykina
  • Lauren Legato
  • Tara Strauss
  1. 1.Duke University Medical CenterDurhamUSA

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