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The Optimal Approach to Post-Mastectomy and Post-Lumpectomy Breast Reconstruction

  • Local-Regional Evaluation and Therapy (EP Mamounas, Section Editor)
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Abstract

The surgical management of breast cancer has changed dramatically over the past 30 years, attributed to improved chemotherapy regimens and a better understanding of tumor biology. There is now a greater emphasis on decreasing surgical morbidity and preserving the breast form. The evolution of oncoplastic surgery has enabled more patients to be candidates for breast-conserving therapy, and the preservation of the entire skin and nipple areolar complex with mastectomy has markedly improved esthetic and patient-reported outcomes. This review provides an overview of the reconstructive options for partial and complete mastectomy, as well as discusses several key factors which markedly influence outcomes.

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Correspondence to Hani Sbitany.

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Merisa L. Piper declares that she has no conflict of interest.

Hani Sbitany is a member of the speaker’s bureau of LifeCell Inc.

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Piper, M.L., Sbitany, H. The Optimal Approach to Post-Mastectomy and Post-Lumpectomy Breast Reconstruction. Curr Breast Cancer Rep 8, 105–111 (2016). https://doi.org/10.1007/s12609-016-0210-y

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