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Hedgehog Pathway Inhibitors: Potential Applications in Breast Cancer

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Abstract

The Hedgehog (Hh) signaling pathway is a developmental pathway with important roles in embryogenesis, epithelial-mesenchymal transition, stem/progenitor cell renewal, and tissue regeneration and repair. Dysregulated Hh signaling is implicated in 25% of human cancers, including breast cancer. Mutations within elements of the Hh signaling pathway leading to ligand-independent activation do not appear to be widespread in breast cancer. However, overexpression of the Hh ligand and Hh target genes has been reported in breast cancer, suggesting a ligand-dependent mechanism for Hh pathway activation in breast carcinogenesis. Small molecule antagonists of the Hh pathway are under clinical development and may present novel therapeutic options for breast cancer.

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Yee Hong Chia reports no potential conflict of interest relevant to this article. Cynthia X. Ma reports no potential conflict of interest relevant to this article.

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Chia, Y.H., Ma, C.X. Hedgehog Pathway Inhibitors: Potential Applications in Breast Cancer. Curr Breast Cancer Rep 3, 15–23 (2011). https://doi.org/10.1007/s12609-010-0031-3

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