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Tai Chi diminishes oxidative stress in Mexican older adults

Abstract

Objective

To determine the effect of Tai Chi on oxidative stress in a population of elderly Mexican subjects.

Design

It was carried out a quasi-experimental study with a sample of 55 healthy subjects randomly divided into two age-matched groups: (i) a control group with 23 subjects and (ii) an experimental group with 32 subjects. The experimental group received daily training in Tai Chi for 50 min.

Measurements

It was measured before and after 6-month of exercise period: thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS), total antioxidant status (TAS), superoxide dismutase (SOD), and glutathione peroxidase (GPx).

Results

It was found that the experimental group exhibited a statistically significant decrease in glucose levels, total cholesterol, low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDLC), and systolic blood pressure, as well as an increase in SOD and GPx activity and TAS compared with the control group (p < 0.05).

Conclusions

Our findings suggest that the daily practice of Tai Chi is useful for reducing OxS in healthy older adults.

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Correspondence to V. M. Mendoza-Núñez.

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Rosado-Pérez, J., Santiago-Osorio, E., Ortiz, R. et al. Tai Chi diminishes oxidative stress in Mexican older adults. J Nutr Health Aging 16, 642–646 (2012). https://doi.org/10.1007/s12603-012-0029-9

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  • DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/s12603-012-0029-9

Key words

  • Tai Chi
  • oxidative stress
  • antioxidants