Ocean Science Journal

, Volume 53, Issue 1, pp 143–147 | Cite as

An Ephemeral Dinoflagellate Bloom during Summer Season in Nearshore Water of Puri, East Coast of India

  • Sanjiba Kumar Baliarsingh
  • Rashmin Dwivedi
  • Aneesh A. Lotliker
  • Reeta Jayashankar
  • Biraja Kumar Sahu
  • Suchismita Srichandan
  • Alakes Samanta
  • Chandanlal Parida
  • Tummala Srinivasakumar
  • Kali Charan Sahu
Note
  • 25 Downloads

Abstract

The present paper reports on the phenomenon of pinkish-red discoloration of the nearshore water of Puri, Odisha on 12th May 2016. Many local newspapers covered this event, as Puri city is a major tourist and pilgrimage place on the east coast of India. Field observations were carried out in order to provide a scientific basis to the event and to elicit possible causes of this discoloration. Taxonomic analysis of the phytoplankton samples revealed the dominance of red colored dinoflagellate species Gonyaulax polygramma, contributing 90% to total phytoplankton population. The localized concentration of G. polygramma was responsible for the pinkish-red discoloration of nearshore water. The exact factor that lay behind the genesis of this bloom could not be delineated due to the short period of its persistence. But two factors - upwelling and anthropogenic nutrient influx - can be viewed as the main cause for this ephemeral bloom. Non-hypoxic conditions in the coastal water following the ephemeral bloom event indicated no significant risk of ecological deterioration to the ambient medium.

Keywords

harmful algae phytoplankton bloom chlorophyll-a Bay of Bengal 

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Copyright information

© Korea Institute of Ocean Science & Technology (KIOST) and the Korean Society of Oceanography (KSO) and Springer Science+Business Media B.V., part of Springer Nature 2017

Authors and Affiliations

  • Sanjiba Kumar Baliarsingh
    • 1
  • Rashmin Dwivedi
    • 1
  • Aneesh A. Lotliker
    • 1
  • Reeta Jayashankar
    • 2
  • Biraja Kumar Sahu
    • 3
  • Suchismita Srichandan
    • 1
  • Alakes Samanta
    • 1
  • Chandanlal Parida
    • 3
  • Tummala Srinivasakumar
    • 1
  • Kali Charan Sahu
    • 3
  1. 1.Indian National Centre for Ocean Information Services (INCOIS)HyderabadIndia
  2. 2.Central Marine Fisheries Research InstitutePuri Field CentreOdishaIndia
  3. 3.Department of Marine SciencesBerhampur UniversityOdishaIndia

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