Skip to main content
Log in

Accumulation features of arsenic species in various fishes collected from coastal cities in Korea

  • Article
  • Published:
Ocean Science Journal Aims and scope Submit manuscript

Abstract

In this study, 36 fish species were collected from three coastal cities in Korea to investigate levels and patterns of six arsenicals (arsenite: As (III), arsenate: As (V), arsenocholine: AsC, arsenobetaine: AsB, monomethylarsonic acid: MMA, and dimethylarsinic acid: DMA). The levels of ∑6 As in the different fish species varied substantially, ranging from 0.02 μg As/g ww (Islaeli carp) to 9.65 μg As/g ww (Skate ray) with a median of 0.40 μg As/g ww. All the arsenicals in marine fishes showed higher levels than those in freshwater fishes due to fish feed living in saline water. Overall, marine carnivorous fishes seem to be more contaminated with arsenic. For all the fish samples, AsB (mean fraction: 90.6%) was dominant among the six arsenicals, indicating biomethylation of inorganic arsenic and accumulation of AsB. Fish species with high water contents showed elevated levels of As (III), but there was no further significant correlations between arsenicals and water/lipid contents. Concentrations of As (V) were significantly lower than those of As (III), which implies that As (V) is reduced during biomethylation of inorganic arsenic. Consequently, we hypothesize that the toxicity of arsenic (mainly derived from As (III)) can be increased by the reduction of As (V), especially for the fish species with higher water contents.

This is a preview of subscription content, log in via an institution to check access.

Access this article

Price excludes VAT (USA)
Tax calculation will be finalised during checkout.

Instant access to the full article PDF.

Similar content being viewed by others

References

  • Ciardullo S, Aureli F, Raggi A, Cubadda F (2010) Arsenic speciation in freshwater fish: focus on extraction and mass balance. Talanta 81:213–221

    Article  Google Scholar 

  • Das HK, Mitra AK, Sengupta PK, Hossain A, Islam F, Rabbani GH (2004) Arsenic concentrations in rice, vegetables, and fish in Bangladesh: a preliminary study. Environ Int 30:383–387

    Article  Google Scholar 

  • Francesconi KA (2010) Arsenic species in seafood: origin and human health implications. Pure Appl Chem 82:373–381

    Article  Google Scholar 

  • Gong Z, Lu X, Ma M, Watt C, Le XC (2002) Arsenic speciation analysis. Talanta 58:77–96

    Article  Google Scholar 

  • Grund SC, Hanusch K, Wolf HU (2000) Arsenic and arsenic compounds. In: Ullmann's encyclopedia of industrial chemistry, Wiley-VCH, Weinheim

    Google Scholar 

  • Hong S, Khim JS, Park J, Son HS, Choi SD, Choi K, Ryu J, Kim CY, Chang GS, Giesy JP (2014) Species- and tissue-specific bioaccumulation of arsenicals in various aquatic organisms from a highly industrialized area in the Pohang City, Korea. Environ Pollut 192:27–35

    Article  Google Scholar 

  • KFDA (2004) Risk assessment of inorganic arsenic in food. Korea Food and Drug Administration, Seoul, 55 p

    Google Scholar 

  • KFDA (2007) Development of analysis method on arsenic chemical in seafood. Korea Food and Drug Administration, Seoul, 229 p

    Google Scholar 

  • KHIDI (2010) National food & nutrition statistics: based on 2008 Korea national health and nutrition examination survey. Korea Health Industry Development Institute, Seoul, 760 p

    Google Scholar 

  • KREI (2009) KREI food balance sheet. Korea Rural Economic Institute, Seoul

    Google Scholar 

  • Kucuksezgin F, Gonul LT, Tasel D (2014) Total and inorganic arsenic levels in some marine organisms from Izmir Bay (Eastern Aegean Sea): a risk assessment. Chemosphere 112:311–316

    Article  Google Scholar 

  • Le XC, Lu X, Li X-F (2004) Peer reviewed: arsenic speciation. Anal Chem 76:26A–33A

    Article  Google Scholar 

  • Leufroy A, Noel L, Dufailly V, Beauchemin D, Guerin T (2011) Determination of seven arsenic species in seafood by ion exchange chromatography coupled to inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry following microwave assisted extraction: method validation and occurrence data. Talanta 83:770–779

    Article  Google Scholar 

  • Mandal BK, Suzuki KT (2002) Arsenic round the world: a review. Talanta 58:201–235

    Article  Google Scholar 

  • Nakazato T, Tao H, Taniguchi T, Isshiki K (2002) Determination of arsenite, arsenate, and monomethylarsonic acid in seawater by ion-exclusion chromatography combined with inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry using reaction cell and hydride generation techniques. Talanta 58:121–132

    Article  Google Scholar 

  • Nam S-H, Oh H-J, Min H-S, Lee J-H (2010) A study on the extraction and quantitation of total arsenic and arsenic species in seafood by HPLC–ICP-MS. Microchem J 95:20–24

    Article  Google Scholar 

  • NIFDS (2010) Human risk assessment of heavy metals in food for safety management systems. National Institute of Food and Drug Safety Evaluation, Seoul, 292 p

    Google Scholar 

  • Saunders JR, Hough C, Knopper LD, Koch I, Reimer KJ (2011) Arsenic transformations in terrestrial small mammal food chains from contaminated sites in Canada. J Environ Monitor 13:1784–1792

    Article  Google Scholar 

  • Shibata Y, Sekiguchi M, Otsuki A, Morita M (1996) Arsenic compounds in zoo- and phyto-plankton of marine origin. Appl organomet chem 10:713–719

    Article  Google Scholar 

  • Slejkovec Z, Bajc Z, Doganoc DZ (2004) Arsenic speciation patterns in freshwater fish. Talanta 62:931–936

    Article  Google Scholar 

  • Soeroes C, Goessler W, Francesconi KA, Kienzl N, Schaeffer R, Fodor P, Kuehnelt D (2005) Arsenic speciation in farmed Hungarian freshwater fish. J Agr Food Chem 53:9238–9243

    Article  Google Scholar 

  • Wahlen R, McSheehy S, Scriver C, Mester Z (2004) Arsenic speciation in marine certified reference materials. J Anal Atom Spectrom 19:876–882

    Article  Google Scholar 

  • Watt C, Le XC (2002) Arsenic speciation in natural waters. In: Cai Y, Braids OC (eds) Biogeochemistry of environmentally important trace elements. American Chemical Society, Washington DC, pp 11–32

    Chapter  Google Scholar 

  • Whaley-Martin KJ, Koch I, Reimer KJ (2012) Arsenic species extraction of biological marine samples (Periwinkles, Littorina littorea) from a highly contaminated site. Talanta 88:187–192

    Article  Google Scholar 

  • WHO/IARC (2004) IARC monographs in the evaluation of carcinogenic risks to humans, vol 84: some drinking-water disinfectants and contaminants, including arsenic. International Agency for Research on Cancer, Lyon, 512 p

    Google Scholar 

  • Williams G, West JM, Koch I, Reimer KJ, Snow ET (2009) Arsenic speciation in the freshwater crayfish, Cherax destructor Clark. Sci Total Environ 407:2650–2658

    Article  Google Scholar 

  • Zmozinski AV, Llorente-Mirandes T, Lopez-Sanchez JF, da Silva MM (2015) Establishment of a method for determination of arsenic species in seafood by LC-ICP-MS. Food Chem 173:1073–1082

    Article  Google Scholar 

Download references

Author information

Authors and Affiliations

Authors

Corresponding author

Correspondence to Sung-Deuk Choi.

Rights and permissions

Reprints and permissions

About this article

Check for updates. Verify currency and authenticity via CrossMark

Cite this article

Choi, SD., Son, HS., Choi, M. et al. Accumulation features of arsenic species in various fishes collected from coastal cities in Korea. Ocean Sci. J. 50, 741–750 (2015). https://doi.org/10.1007/s12601-015-0066-5

Download citation

  • Received:

  • Revised:

  • Accepted:

  • Published:

  • Issue Date:

  • DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/s12601-015-0066-5

Keywords

Navigation