Ocean Science Journal

, Volume 50, Issue 2, pp 231–235

Genetic similarity of the Hainan medaka populations collected from hyper- and hypo-osmotic environments in northern Vietnam

  • Hideki Hayakawa
  • Quang Dung Le
  • Masato Kinoshita
  • Yusuke Takehana
  • Kei Sakuma
  • Hirohiko Takeshima
  • Shigeaki Kojima
  • Kiyoshi Naruse
  • Koji Inoue
Article

Abstract

Ricefishes of the genus Oryzias, including Japanese medaka (O. latipes), are known as excellent model organisms for studies in various fields of science. Some species of the genus inhabit brackish water, and such species are recognized to be useful to investigate physiological phenomena in seawater. However, only a limited number of species have been recorded from brackish waters. In addition, there is no information about the genetic relationship among populations inhabiting sites with different salinities. Here we report the discovery of Oryzias fish in two locations near Haiphong, northern Vietnam, a brackish mangrove planting area and a freshwater pond. A phylogenetic analysis using mitochondrial 12S and 16S ribosomal RNA (rRNA) gene sequences indicated that the fish from the two localities are the same species, Hainan medaka, O. curvinotus. Population genetic analysis using the mitochondrial 12S and 16S rRNA gene sequences revealed a close genetic relationship between the two populations. These results suggest that O. curvinotus is adaptable to both hyperosmotic and hypoosmotic environments. Due to its osmotic adaptability and ease of rearing in the laboratory, this species is expected to become a model for marine environmental and toxicological studies, as well as for studies of osmotic adaptation mechanisms.

Key words

Oryzias curvinotus population genetics molecular phylogenetics euryhalinity environmental sciences 

Preview

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

References

  1. Clement M, Posada D, Crandall KA (2000) TCS: a computer program to estimate gene genealogies. Mol Ecol 9:1657–1659CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  2. Evans DH (2008) Teleost fish osmoregulation: what have we learned since August Krogh, Homer Smith, and Ancel Keys. Am J Physiol Regul Integr Comp Physiol 295:R704–R713CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  3. Exocoffier L, Laval G, Schneider S (2005) Arelequin ver. 3.0: an integrated software package for population genetics data analysis. Evol Bioinform Online 1:47–50Google Scholar
  4. Inoue K, Takei Y (2002) Diverse adaptability in Oryzias species to high environmental salinity. Zool Sci 19:727–734CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  5. Inoue K, Takei Y (2003) Asian medaka fishes offer new models for studying mechanisms of seawater adaptation. Comp Biochem Physiol B 136:635–645CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  6. Inoue K, Miyanishi H, Nobata S, Takei Y (2012) Evolutionary implication of the absense of atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) in euryhaline Oryzias fishes. Environ Biol Fish 94:559–566CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  7. Katoh K, Toh H (2008) Recent developments in the MAFFT multiple sequence alignment program. Brief Bioinform 9:286–298CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  8. Kinoshita M, Murata K, Naruse K, Tanaka M (2009) Medaka: biology, management, and experimental protocols. Wiley-Blackwell, Iowa, USA, 444 pGoogle Scholar
  9. McCormick SD, Farrell AP, Brauner CJ (2013) Fish physiology vol. 32: euryhaline fishes. Academic Press, Amsterdam, 594 pGoogle Scholar
  10. Parenti LR (2008) A phylogenetic analysis and taxonomic revision of rice fishes, Oryzias and relatives (Beloniformes, Adrianichthyidae). Zool J Linnaean Soc 154:494–610CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  11. Raymond M, Rousset F (1995) GENEPOP (version 1.2): population genetics software for exact tests and ecumenicism. J Hered 86:248–249Google Scholar
  12. Setiamarga DHE, Miya M, Yamanoue Y, Azuma Y, Inoue JG, Ishiguro NB, Mabuchi K, Nishida M (2008) Divergence time of the two regional medaka populations in Japan as a new time scale for comparative genomics of vertebrates. Biol Lett 5:812–816CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  13. Stamatakis A (2006) RAxML-VI-HPC: maximum likelihood-based phylogenetic analyses with thousands of taxa and mixed models. Bioinformatics 22:2688–2690CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  14. Takehana Y, Naruse K, Sakaizumi M (2005) Molecular phylogeny of the medaka fishes genus Oryzias (Beloniformes: Adrianichthyidae) based on molecular and mitochondrial DNA sequences. Mol Phylogenet Evol 36:417–428CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  15. Takei Y, Hirose S (2002) The natriuretic peptide system in eels: a key endocrine system for euryhalinity? Am J Physiol Regul Integr Comp Physiol 282:R940–R951CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  16. Takei Y, Ogoshi M, Inoue K (2007) A ‘reverse’ phylogenetic approach for identification of novel osmoregulatory and cardiovascular hormones in vertebrates. Front Neuroendocrin 28:143–160CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  17. Weir BS, Cockerham CC (1984) Estimating F-Statistics for the analysis of population structure. Evolution 38:1358–1370CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  18. Yanagishima S, Mori S (1957) Studies on the variation and adaptation of fishes. I. Adaptation of killifish (Oryzias latipes T. & S.) to saline water. 1. Field study. Zool Mag 66:351–358 (in Japanese)Google Scholar
  19. Yusof S, Ismail A, Koito T, Kinoshita M, Inoue K (2012) Occurrence of two closely related ricefishes, Javanese medaka (Oryzias javanicus) and Indian medaka (O. dancena) at sites with different salinity in Peninsular Malaysia. Env Biol Fish 93:43–49CrossRefGoogle Scholar

Copyright information

© Korea Ocean Research & Development Institute (KORDI) and the Korean Society of Oceanography (KSO) and Springer Science+Business Media Dordrecht 2015

Authors and Affiliations

  • Hideki Hayakawa
    • 1
  • Quang Dung Le
    • 2
  • Masato Kinoshita
    • 3
  • Yusuke Takehana
    • 4
  • Kei Sakuma
    • 1
  • Hirohiko Takeshima
    • 1
  • Shigeaki Kojima
    • 1
    • 5
  • Kiyoshi Naruse
    • 4
  • Koji Inoue
    • 1
  1. 1.Atmosphere and Ocean Research InstituteThe University of TokyoKashiwaJapan
  2. 2.Institute of Marine Environment and ResourcesHaiphong CityVietnam
  3. 3.Division of Applied Biosciences, Graduate School of AgricultureKyoto UniversityKyotoJapan
  4. 4.Laboratory of BioresourcesNational Institute for Basic BiologyOkazakiJapan
  5. 5.Graduate School of Frontier SciencesThe University of TokyoKashiwaJapan

Personalised recommendations