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Low back pain associated with pregnancy: a review of literature

Abstract

Introduction

Low back is a common problem for all women but there is an increased incidence of back pain associated with pregnancy.

Incidence

The most common complaint of pregnant women, low back pain can be the normal result of a multitude of mechanical, hormonal, and vascular changes associated with pregnancy. However, while usually regarded with a laissez-faire attitude, back pain during pregnancy should be taken seriously by patients and physicians. A number of serious pathological processes could be involved endangering both mother and fetus.

Treatment

Treatment options for low back pain consist mostly of postural education and rest. Physical therapy and fitness programs are available to prevent back pain and alleviate pain if it already exists. Alternative therapies are becoming more and more popular in the pregnant population as a safe means to combat pain. More vigorous treatment is available for serious problems. However, most women use an at-home-approach with support belts, heating pads, and postural pillows. Whatever the cause, low back pain is a significant distressing factor to pregnant women and should not be ignored as a normal consequence of becoming pregnant.

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Correspondence to Bernardino Saccomanni.

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Saccomanni, B. Low back pain associated with pregnancy: a review of literature. Eur Orthop Traumatol 1, 169–174 (2011). https://doi.org/10.1007/s12570-010-0030-x

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Keywords

  • Spine
  • Pregnancy