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The association between sacralization and spondylolisthesis

Abstract

The role of transitional vertebra in spondylolisthesis is still an enigma. Theoretically, obstruction of movements in the L5-S1 joint should provoke hypermobility at the L4–L5 vertebrae, thus leading to the development of spondylolisthesis. The aim of this study was to inquire whether a positive association exists between sacralization and spondylolisthesis. For this purpose, CT images of 436 consecutive patients were examined for the presence of sacralization and spondylolisthesis. The sample was divided into two groups: a sacralization group and non-sacralization group. Independent variables considered were age, sex and degree of lordosis. Sacralization was found in 13.1 % of the individuals examined. It was found to be gender- and age-independent (P > 0.05), Spondylolisthesis was identified in 7.3 % of the individuals examined and found to be gender independent (P > 0.05), and age dependent (P < 0.05). No association between the presence of sacralization and spondylolisthesis was found. The mean lordosis angle in the spondylolisthesis group was 60.41° compared with 50.84° in patients without spondylolisthesis. No association was found between sacralization and the angle of lordosis (P > 0.05). The current study did not reveal an association between sacralization and spondylolisthesis and as such sacralization should not be considered an etiology for the development of degenerative spondylolisthesis.

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Acknowledgment

The authors thank Mrs. Phyllis Curchack Kornspan for her editorial services.

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Correspondence to Gali Dar.

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Dar, G., Peled, N. The association between sacralization and spondylolisthesis. Anat Sci Int 89, 156–160 (2014). https://doi.org/10.1007/s12565-013-0213-y

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Keywords

  • Sacralization
  • Spondylolisthesis
  • Stability
  • Lumbar lordosis
  • Transitional vertebra
  • Transition zone