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Developing Singapore school leaders to handle complexity in times of uncertainty

Abstract

In times of uncertainty, university faculties have a duty to prepare school leaders to handle complexity, as the number of variables in the educational system and the interactivity of variables increase exponentially. The Leaders in Education Program (LEP) is a 6-month full-time program at the Singapore National Institute of Education (NIE, which is a part of Nanyang Technological University). The LEP aims to prepare especially selected vice-principals and ministry officers in Singapore for school leadership. The LEP is a collaborative effort between the NIE and the Ministry of Education, an example of a university–government partnership in program development. This article describes the efforts of the LEP in developing the ability of school leaders to deal with complexity. It also examines in detail one particular component of the LEP, the Creative Action Project, to illustrate how this is done in practice, and analyzes the views of participants on their learning through the project.

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Correspondence to Pak Tee Ng.

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Ng, P.T. Developing Singapore school leaders to handle complexity in times of uncertainty. Asia Pacific Educ. Rev. 14, 67–73 (2013). https://doi.org/10.1007/s12564-013-9253-1

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  • DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/s12564-013-9253-1

Keywords

  • Uncertainty
  • Complexity
  • School leadership
  • Principals
  • University–government partnership
  • Program development