Skip to main content

Peripheries and centers: research universities in developing countries

Abstract

The research university is a central institution of the twenty-first century—providing access to global science, producing basic and applied research, and educating leaders of the academe and society. Worldwide, there are very few research universities—they are expensive to develop and support, and the pressures of massification have placed priorities elsewhere. For developing countries, research universities are especially rare, and yet they are especially important as key ingredients for economic and social progress. This article argues for the importance of research universities in developing and middle-income countries and points out some of the challenges that such institutions face.

This is a preview of subscription content, access via your institution.

References

  • Altbach, P. G. (1987). The knowledge context: Comparative perspectives on the distribution of knowledge. Albany: State University of New York Press.

    Google Scholar 

  • Altbach, P. G. (Ed.). (1999). Private Prometheus: Private higher education and development in the 21st century. Westport, CT: Greenwood.

    Google Scholar 

  • Altbach, P. G. (2001). The American academic model in comparative perspective. In P. G. Altbach, P. J. Gumport, & D. B. Johnstone (Eds.), In defense of American higher education (pp. 11–37). Baltimore: Johns Hopkins University Press.

    Google Scholar 

  • Altbach, P. G. (Ed.). (2003). The decline of the guru: The academic profession in developing and middle-income countries. New York: Palgrave.

    Google Scholar 

  • Altbach, P. G. (2004). Globalization and the university: Myths and realities in an unequal world. Tertiary Education and Management, 10, 3–25.

    Article  Google Scholar 

  • Altbach, P. G. (2007). Academic freedom: International realities and challenges. In P. G. Altbach (Ed.), Tradition, transition: The international imperative in higher education (pp. 49–66). Rotterdam, Netherlands: Sense Publishers.

    Google Scholar 

  • Altbach, P. G., & Umakoshi, T. (Eds.). (2004). Asian universities: Historical perspectives and contemporary challenges. Baltimore: Johns Hopkins University Press.

    Google Scholar 

  • Arishie, M. (2006). Keeping the proofs in funds. Egyptian Gazette (Cairo), March 16, p. 2.

  • Chait, R. P. (Ed.). (2002). The questions of tenure. Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press.

    Google Scholar 

  • Douglass, J. A. (2000). The California idea and American higher education: 1850 to the 1960 Master Plan. Stanford, CA: Stanford University Press.

    Google Scholar 

  • El-Khawas, E. (2006). Accountability and quality assurance: New issues for academic inquiry. In J. J. F. Forest & P. G. Altbach (Eds.), International handbook of higher education (pp. 23–38). Dordrecht, Netherlands: Springer.

    Chapter  Google Scholar 

  • Enders, J. (Ed.). (2001). Academic staff in Europe: Changing contexts and conditions. Westport, CT: Greenwood.

    Google Scholar 

  • Geiger, R. L. (2004). Money and knowledge: Research universities and the paradox of the marketplace. Stanford, CA: Stanford University Press.

    Google Scholar 

  • Hutchins, R. M. (1995). The higher learning in America. New Brunswick, NJ: Transaction (originally published in 1936).

  • Kerr, C. (2001). The uses of the university. Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press.

    Google Scholar 

  • Kirp, D. (2003). Shakespeare, Einstein, and the bottom line: The marketing of higher education. Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press.

    Google Scholar 

  • Lewis, H. R. (2006). Excellence without a soul: How a great university forgot education. New York: Public Affairs.

    Google Scholar 

  • Liu, N. C. (2007). Research universities in China: Differentiation, classification, and future world-class status. In P. G. Altbach & J. Balán (Eds.), World-class worldwide: Transforming research universities in Asia and Latin America (pp. 55–70). Baltimore: Johns Hopkins University Press.

    Google Scholar 

  • Lyall, K. C., & Sell, K. R. (2006). The true genius of America at risk: Are we losing our public universities to de facto privatization? Westport, CT: Praeger.

    Google Scholar 

  • Ma, W. (2007). The flagship university and China’s economic reform. In P. G. Altbach & J. Balán (Eds.), World-class worldwide: Transforming research universities in Asia and Latin America (pp. 31–54). Baltimore: Johns Hopkins University Press.

    Google Scholar 

  • Odorika, I., & Pusser, B. (2007). La máxima casa de estudios: Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México as a state-building university. In P. G. Altbach & J. Balán (Eds.), World-class worldwide: Transforming research universities in Asia and Latin America (pp. 189–215). Baltimore: Johns Hopkins University Press.

    Google Scholar 

  • Perkin, H. (2006). History of universities. In J. J. F. Forest & P. G. Altbach (Eds.), International handbook of higher education (pp. 159–206). Dordrecht, Netherlands: Springer.

    Chapter  Google Scholar 

  • Pocha, J. S. (2006). Internet exposes plagiarism in China, but punishment of professors rare at universities. Boston Globe, April 9.

  • Rosenzweig, R. M. (1998). The political university: Policy, politics, and presidential leadership in the American research university. Baltimore: Johns Hopkins University Press.

    Google Scholar 

  • Schuster, J. H., & Finkelstein, M. J. (2006). The American faculty: The restructuring of academic work and careers. Baltimore: Johns Hopkins University Press.

    Google Scholar 

  • Slaughter, S., & Leslie, L. L. (1997). Academic capitalism: Politics, policies, and the entrepreneurial university. Baltimore: Johns Hopkins University Press.

    Google Scholar 

  • Slaughter, S., & Rhoades, G. (2004). Academic capitalism and the new economy: Markets, state, and higher education. Baltimore: Johns Hopkins University Press.

    Google Scholar 

  • Task Force on Higher Education and Society. (2000). Higher education in developing countries: Peril and promise. Washington, DC: World Bank.

    Google Scholar 

  • Trow, M. (2006). Reflections on the transition from elite to mass to universal access: Forms and phases of higher education in modern societies. In J. J. F. Forest & P. G. Altbach (Eds.), International handbook of higher education (pp. 243–280). Dordrecht, Netherlands: Springer.

    Chapter  Google Scholar 

  • Vucinich, A. (1984). Empire of knowledge: The Academy of Sciences of the USSR (1917–1970). Berkeley: University of California Press.

    Google Scholar 

Download references

Acknowledgment

A different version of this article appears in Altbach, P. G. and Jorge Balán, eds. World Class Worldwide: Transforming Research Universities in Asia and Latin America. © 2007. The Johns Hopkins University Press. Reprinted with permission of The Johns Hopkins University Press.

Author information

Authors and Affiliations

Authors

Corresponding author

Correspondence to Philip G. Altbach.

Rights and permissions

Reprints and Permissions

About this article

Cite this article

Altbach, P.G. Peripheries and centers: research universities in developing countries. Asia Pacific Educ. Rev. 10, 15–27 (2009). https://doi.org/10.1007/s12564-009-9000-9

Download citation

  • Received:

  • Accepted:

  • Published:

  • Issue Date:

  • DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/s12564-009-9000-9

Keywords