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Adaptive leader-follower formation control of mobile robots with unknown skidding and slipping effects

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Abstract

This paper investigates an adaptive leader-follower formation control problem of multiple mobile robots in the presence of unknown skidding and slipping. First, we employ the concept of virtual robots to achieve the desired formation and derive the kinematics of the virtual leader and follower robots considering skidding and slipping effects. Then, we design an adaptive formation controller based on a two-dimensional error surface where the adaptive technique is used for compensating the unknown skidding and slipping effects that influence the follower robots. From Lyapunov stability theorem, we show that all errors of the closed-loop system are uniformly ultimately bounded, and thus the desired formation is successfully achieved regardless of the presence of unknown skidding and slipping effects. Simulation results are provided to demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed formation control scheme.

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Correspondence to Sung Jin Yoo.

Additional information

Bong Seok Park received his B.S., M.S., and Ph.D. degrees in Electrical and Electronic Engineering from Yonsei University, in 2005, 2008, and 2011, respectively. Since 2012, he has been with the Department of Electronic Engineering, Chosun University, where he is currently an Assistant Professor. His research interests include nonlinear control, adaptive control, formation control, and the control of robots.

Sung Jin Yoo received his B.S., M.S., and Ph.D. degrees from Yonsei University, Seoul, Korea, in 2003, 2005, and 2009, respectively, in Electrical and Electronic Engineering. He has been a Post-doctoral researcher in the Department of Mechanical Science and Engineering, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Illinois from 2009 to 2010. He is currently an Assistant Professor in the School of Electrical and Electronics Engineering, Chung-Ang University, Seoul, Korea. His research interests include nonlinear adaptive control, decentralized control, distributed control, and neural networks theories, and their applications to robotic, flight, and time-delay systems.

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Park, B.S., Yoo, S.J. Adaptive leader-follower formation control of mobile robots with unknown skidding and slipping effects. Int. J. Control Autom. Syst. 13, 587–594 (2015). https://doi.org/10.1007/s12555-014-0249-3

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  • DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/s12555-014-0249-3

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