Mycotoxin Research

, Volume 26, Issue 4, pp 217–220 | Cite as

Blood plasma levels of deoxynivalenol and its de-epoxy metabolite in broilers after a single oral dose of the toxin

  • Agha Waqar Yunus
  • Hana Valenta
  • Sherif M. Abdel-Raheem
  • Susanne Döll
  • Sven Dänicke
  • Josef Böhm
Original Paper

Abstract

To evaluate the transfer of deoxynivalenol (DON) and its de-epoxy metabolite (de-epoxy-DON) in the plasma of chicken, mashed oats naturally contaminated with 9.5 mg DON/kg were fed to four broilers (35 days age) at a dose of 20 g/bird. Blood samples were then collected from two birds at 1 h, 3 h, and 5 h post-feeding, while from the other two birds at 2 h, 4 h, and 6 h post-feeding. Analysis of DON and de-epoxy-DON was carried out by using liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry after clean-up with immunoaffinity columns. At 1 h, 3 h, and 5 h post-feeding, the average values of plasma DON were 0.35 ng/ml, 0.20 ng/ml, and 0.15 ng/ml, respectively. The corresponding average values of de-epoxy-DON at these time points were 0.70 ng/ml, 0.80 ng/ml, and 0.25 ng/ml, respectively. The sum of DON and de-epoxy-DON appearing in the plasma at 1 h post-feeding in these birds was estimated to be 0.044% of the total DON fed. At 2 h, 4 h, and 6 h post-feeding, the average values of plasma DON were 0.85 ng/ml, 0.45 ng/ml, and 0.30 ng/ml. De-epoxy-DON could not be detected in the birds sampled at 2 h, 4 h, and 6 h post-feeding. The total amount of DON appearing in the plasma at 2 h post-feeding in these birds was estimated to be 0.036% of the DON fed. These data show that the absorption rate of DON is very low in broilers and that there is also a rapid transformation, and clearance from plasma. Furthermore, there appeared to be individual variability in the capacity of birds to de-epoxidise DON.

Keywords

Deoxynivalenol De-epoxy-deoxynivalenol Plasma Broiler 

References

  1. Böhm J (2000) Fusarientoxine in der Tierernährung. Übersicht Tierern 28:271–281 (in German)Google Scholar
  2. Dänicke S, Ueberschär KH, Valenta H, Matthes S, Matthäus K, Halle I (2004a) Effects of graded levels of Fusarium-toxin-contaminated wheat in Pekin duck diets on performance, health and metabolism of deoxynivalenol and zearalenone. Brit Poult Sci 45:264–272. doi:10.1080/00071660410001715876 CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  3. Dänicke S, Valenta H, Klobasa F, Döll S, Ganter M, Flachowsky G (2004b) Effects of graded levels of Fusarium toxin-contaminated wheat in diets for fattening pigs on growth performance, nutrient digestibility, deoxynivalenol balance and clinical serum characteristics. Arch Anim Nutr 58:1–17. doi:10.1080/0003942031000161045 CrossRefPubMedGoogle Scholar
  4. Dänicke S, Valenta H, Matthes S (2007) On the interactions between Fusarium toxin-contaminated wheat and nonstarch polysaccharide hydrolyzing enzymes in diets of broilers on performance, intestinal viscosity, and carryover of deoxynivalenol. Poult Sci 86:291–298PubMedGoogle Scholar
  5. Eriksen GS, Pattersson H (2004) Toxicological evaluation of trichothecenes in animal feed. Anim Feed Sci Technol 114:205–239. doi:10.1016/j.anifeedsci.2003.08.008 CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  6. Hedman R, Pettersson H (1997) Transformation of nivalenol by gastrointestinal microbes. Arch Anim Nutr 50:321–329. doi:10.1080/17450399709386142 CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  7. National Research Council (1994) Nutrient requirements of poultry, 9th rev edn. National Academy Press, Washington D.C.Google Scholar
  8. Prelusky DB, Hamilton RMG, Trenholm HL, Miller JD (1986) Tissue distribution and excretion of radioactivity following administration of 14C-labeled deoxynivalenol to White Leghorn hens. Fundam Appl Toxicol 7:635–645. doi:10.1016/0272-0590(86)90113-2 CrossRefPubMedGoogle Scholar
  9. Valenta H, Dänicke S (2005) Study on the transmission of deoxynivalenol and deepoxy-deoxynivalenol into eggs of laying hens using a high-performance liquid chromatography-ultraviolet method with clean-up by immunoaffinity columns. Mol Nutr Food Res 49:779–785. doi:10.1002/mnfr.200500012 CrossRefPubMedGoogle Scholar
  10. Valenta H, Dänicke S, Döll S (2003) Analysis of deoxynivalenol and de-epoxy-deoxynivalenol in animal tissues by liquid chromatography after clean-up with an immunoaffinity column. Mycotox Res 19:51–55. doi:10.1007/BF02940093 CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  11. Yahav S, Straschnow A, Plavnik I, Hurwitz S (1997) Blood system response of chickens to changes in environmental temperature. Poult Sci 76:627–633PubMedGoogle Scholar

Copyright information

© Society for Mycotoxin Research and Springer 2010

Authors and Affiliations

  • Agha Waqar Yunus
    • 1
  • Hana Valenta
    • 2
  • Sherif M. Abdel-Raheem
    • 3
  • Susanne Döll
    • 2
  • Sven Dänicke
    • 2
  • Josef Böhm
    • 1
  1. 1.Institute of Animal NutritionUniversity of Veterinary Medicine ViennaViennaAustria
  2. 2.Institute of Animal NutritionFriedrich-Loeffler-InstituteBraunschweigGermany
  3. 3.Nutrition and Clinical Nutrition Department, Faculty of Veterinary MedicineAssiut UniversityAssiutEgypt

Personalised recommendations