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Talexirhynchia, a new rhynchonellid genus from the Jurassic Ethiopian Province of Jordan

Abstract

A new genus and species of a rhynchonellide brachiopod from the Jurassic of Jordan, Talexirhynchia kadishi gen. et sp. nov., is described. The specimens were collected from the Mughanniyya Formation (Callovian) of Wadi Zarqa from alternating claystones, siltstones, and marly limestones with minor dolomite, dolomitic limestone, and coquinas that represent the upper part of the Jurassic sequence in Jordan. The environment of deposition was neritic; food supply and light were unlikely to have been limiting factors. The specimens are related to Ethiopian-Somali taxa and are consistent with the endemism that characterizes the rhynchonellide brachiopod faunas of the Jurassic Ethiopian Province. Specimens of Talexirhynchia lived with the umbo in an upright position directed toward the seafloor or with the dorsal valve slightly above the ventral valve. Juveniles were attached to the seafloor by the pedicle; carbonate shell material as well as other debris scattered on a limy substrate, such as shells and rocks, could have served as an attachment site for juveniles. With increasing growth, the loss of the pedicle and a semi-infaunal position resulted in an increasingly incurved ventral umbo that concealed the foramen.

Kurzfassung

Eine neue rhynchonellide Brachiopoden-Gattung und––Art, Talexirhynchia kadishi gen. et sp. nov., aus dem Jura von Jordan wird beschrieben. Die Exemplare wurden in der Mughanniyya Formation (Callovium) von Wadi Zarqa gesammelt und kommen in abwechselnden Lagen von Tonsteinen, Siltsteinen und mergeligen Kalken mit geringen Anteilen an Dolomiten, dolomitischen Kalken und Coquinas vor, die die jüngsten jurassischen Ablagerungen Jordaniens repräsentieren. Die Schichten wurden in neritischer Fazies abgelagert, die wahrschein reich an Nahrungsangebot und Licht durchflutet war. Die gesammelten Exemplare sind mit äthiopischen-somalischen Taxa verwandt und spiegeln den Endemismus wieder, der die rhynchonellide Brachiopodenfauna der jurassischen Äthiopischen Provininz charakterisiert. Vertreter von Talexirhynchia leben in senkrechter Position mit der Dorsalklappe gering höher als die Ventralklappe und dem Wirbel zum Meeresboden hin gerichtet. Juvenile Exemplare waren mit dem Stiel an Schalenmaterial und anderem Schuttdebris, z.B. Schalen oder Steine, der auf dem Meeresboden verteilt vorlag, festgehaftet. Mit zunehmender Größe änderte sich die Lebensweise in eine semi-infaunale Position, die zu einem Verlust des Stieles und eines ständig weiter gebogenen ventralen Wirbels bis hin zu vollständigen Bedeckung des Stiellochs, führte.

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Acknowledgments

Feldman would like to acknowledge the Touro College Faculty Research Fund for supporting this project and thank the members of its peer review panel. We thank Jann Thompson and Daniel Levin (National Museum of Natural History/Smithsonian Institution, Washington DC, USA) and Lee Davies (Natural History Museum, London, UK) for providing access to the brachiopod collection. Many thanks are due to Juliane Eberhardt and Erika Scheller-Wagner (Senckenberg Forschungsinstitut and Naturmuseum, Frankfurt am Main, Germany) for technical help. The visit of M. S.-G. to the American Museum of Natural History, New York, was supported by a Lerner Grey Award. M. S.-G. thanks Russell Garwood (Manchester University, UK) and Mark Sutton (Imperial College, London, UK) for instructions, help, and endless patience in solving SPIERS problems.

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Correspondence to Howard R. Feldman.

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M. Schemm-Gregory: Deceased.

Howard R. Feldman: Biology Department, Lander College for Women, The Anna Ruth and Mark Hasten School, A Division of Touro College, New York, NY 10023, USA.

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Feldman, H.R., Schemm-Gregory, M., Wilson, M.A. et al. Talexirhynchia, a new rhynchonellid genus from the Jurassic Ethiopian Province of Jordan. Paläontol Z 89, 25–35 (2015). https://doi.org/10.1007/s12542-013-0216-y

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Keywords

  • Talexirhynchia
  • Rhynchonellida
  • Brachiopoda
  • Middle Jurassic
  • Ethiopian Province
  • Jordan

Schlüsselwörter

  • Talexirhynchia
  • Rhynchonellida
  • Brachiopoda
  • Mittel-Jura
  • Äthiopische Provinz
  • Jordanian