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Alterations of human responses by varying dynamic rotational perturbations on balance training equipment

Abstract

Multiple studies investigated the correlation between balance and sports performance. Few studies, however, investigated control strategies for base plate rotational perturbation on balance training equipment to maximize balance-training efficiency. Thus, this study analyzed human responses by varying base plate rotational perturbations and provided fundamental data for strategy to maximize balance-training efficiency. Base plate rotation was controlled to induce dynamic rotational perturbations in the anteriorposterior (AP), right-diagonal (RD), medial-lateral (ML) and left-diagonal (LD) directions. A three-dimensional motion-capture, pedar flexible insoles and wireless surface electromyography systems were used. The joint angles, balance indices and muscle activations and co-contractions were significantly different in response to the dynamic rotational perturbations (p < 0.05). The joint angle and balance index changes were greater with AP and ML dynamic rotational perturbations than those in others (p < 0.05). In AP dynamic rotational perturbation, vastus lateralis and soleus activations were generally higher than those of other muscles (p < 0.05). Biceps femoris activation was particularly the highest in ML dynamic rotational perturbation. In conclusion, this study identified that specialized human responses occurred based on the base plate rotational perturbation characteristics on balancetraining equipment. These findings indicate that it may be necessary to control the base plate rotational perturbations corresponding to the sport characteristics.

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Correspondence to Dohyung Lim.

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Jung, H., Kim, H.J., Kim, BR. et al. Alterations of human responses by varying dynamic rotational perturbations on balance training equipment. Int. J. Precis. Eng. Manuf. 18, 1269–1274 (2017). https://doi.org/10.1007/s12541-017-0149-6

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  • DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/s12541-017-0149-6

Keywords

  • Dynamic rotational perturbation
  • Balance-training efficiency
  • Balance index
  • Joint angle
  • Muscle activation & co-contraction