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Motivation, instructional design, flow, and academic achievement at a Korean online university: a structural equation modeling study

Abstract

The purpose of this study is to examine the structural relationships among self-efficacy, intrinsic value, test anxiety, instructional design, flow, and achievement among students at a Korean online university. To address research questions, the researchers administered online surveys to 963 college students at an online university in Korea enrolled in a Computer Application course. Structural equation modeling was conducted to investigate the structural relationships among the variables. Findings indicated that (1) self-efficacy and instructional design had statistically significant direct effects on flow, (2) self-efficacy, intrinsic value, and flow had statistically significant direct effects on achievement, and (3) flow mediates self-efficacy and achievement, and instructional design and achievement.

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Acknowledgments

This work was supported by a National Research Foundation of Korea Grant funded by the Korean Government (2012-045331).

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Correspondence to Eunjung Oh.

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Joo, Y.J., Oh, E. & Kim, S.M. Motivation, instructional design, flow, and academic achievement at a Korean online university: a structural equation modeling study. J Comput High Educ 27, 28–46 (2015). https://doi.org/10.1007/s12528-015-9090-9

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Keywords

  • Online learning
  • Motivation
  • Instructional design
  • Flow
  • Achievement