Modeling the customer satisfaction function: a two-country comparison

Abstract

This paper provides a framework that integrates and reinterprets prior research on satisfaction modeling (function) and proposes the existence of non-linear and curvilinear/higher-order relationships to model online banking customers. It provides a framework that examines two closely related but distinct countries—Malaysia, a developing country, and Singapore, a developed country—and identifies whether modeling online banking customers through satisfaction is unique to each context or is generic. Using a systematic and step-by-step hierarchical moderated regression approach, this study tries to understand the relationship among repurchase intention, satisfaction, and trust, moderated by bank size. Malaysia portrays a linear relationship, while Singapore depicts non-linear and curvilinear/high-order relationships. The findings suggest that modeling online banking customers through satisfaction depends on a country’s economic development. By contrast, prior studies on modeling customers through satisfaction were conducted independently and did not employ proper and systematic steps to capture the satisfaction function.

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Authors

Corresponding author

Correspondence to Ding Hooi Ting.

Additional information

Responsible Editor: Steven Bellman

Appendix

Appendix

Trust

  • I feel that I can trust this online banking completely.

  • I feel that this online banking is dependable.

  • Security of electronic transactions

  • System security of online banking

  • Compliance with needs and requirements

  • Privacy in electronic transactions

Satisfaction

  • Overall, I am satisfied with this online banking.

  • My choice to use this online banking was a wise one.

  • This online banking has been a good experience.

  • This online banking has worked well.

  • This online banking is what I need.

Bank Size

  • Well known

  • Good reputation

  • Large scale

  • Huge asset

  • Steadfast

  • Resource availability

Repurchase Intention

How likely are you to:

  • use this online banking in the future?

  • make an effort to use this online banking in your transactions?

  • ensure all online banking transactions are through this bank?

  • continue using this online banking as your transaction choice?

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Cite this article

Ting, D.H. Modeling the customer satisfaction function: a two-country comparison. Electron Markets 28, 163–175 (2018). https://doi.org/10.1007/s12525-018-0286-5

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Keywords

  • Online banking
  • Satisfaction
  • Linear
  • Non-linear
  • Developed country
  • Developing country

JEL classification

  • M300