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Stage antecedents of consumer online buying behavior

Abstract

Unlike previous research which adopts simultaneous measures to examine customers’ satisfaction with the entire online shopping experience, this study examines two important stages of online buying behavior: ordering and fulfillment. The explicit consideration of the two stages acknowledges the fact that in an online environment, the two stages are distinct and there is a delay between the time a customer makes an order and the time he receives delivery of the merchandise. Examined are the antecedents and consequences of customer satisfaction in different stages of the online buying process based on the expectation–confirmation model (ECM). Results indicate that the customers’ satisfaction with the ordering process and the fulfillment process, and the perceived usefulness of the website contribute significantly to their intention to continue using a business-to-consumer (B2C) website. It is also shown that the customers’ perceived usefulness affects their satisfaction only with the ordering process but not with the fulfillment process. Implications and limitations are discussed.

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Correspondence to Prashant Palvia.

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Responsible editor: Hans-Dieter Zimmermann

Appendix

Appendix

List of items by construct

Confirmation with ordering process (CWOP)

  1. CWOP1:

    The ease of use of the website (e.g. convenience and speed of ordering) was better than what I expected.

  2. CWOP2:

    The breadth/depth of products offered by the website was better than what I expected.

  3. CWOP3:

    The product information quality (e.g. information quantity, quality, and relevance) offered by the website was better than what I expected.

  4. CWOP4:

    The website performance (e.g. layout, links, pictures, images, and speed) was better than what I expected.

Confirmation with fulfillment process (CWFP)

  1. CWFP1:

    The on-time delivery (expected vs. actual delivery date) of products was better than what I expected.

  2. CWFP2:

    The product representation (product description/depiction vs. what you received) was better than what I expected.

  3. CWFP3:

    The customer support (e.g. status updates and complaint/question handling) offered by the website was better than what I expected.

  4. CWFP4:

    The ability to effectively track orders was better than what I expected.

Perceived usefulness (PU)

  1. PU1:

    Using the website improves my performance in information seeking and purchasing

  2. PU2:

    Using the website enables me to seek and purchase faster

  3. PU3:

    Using the website enhances my effectiveness in information seeking and purchasing

  4. PU4:

    Using the website increases my productivity in information seeking and purchasing

Satisfaction with ordering process (SWOP)

How do you feel about your experience of using the website in the ordering stage of online buying process:

  1. SWOP1:

    Very dissatisfied/Very satisfied

  2. SWOP2:

    Very displeased/Very pleased

  3. SWOP3:

    Very frustrated/Very contented

  4. SWOP4:

    Absolutely terrible/Absolutely delighted

Satisfaction with fulfillment process (SWFP)

How do you feel about your experience of using the website in the fulfillment stage of online buying process:

  1. SWFP1:

    Very dissatisfied/Very satisfied

  2. SWFP2:

    Very displeased/Very pleased

  3. SWFP3:

    Very frustrated/Very contented

  4. SWFP4:

    Absolutely terrible/Absolutely delighted

Continuance intention (CI)

  1. CI1:

    I intend to continue using the website in the future

  2. CI2:

    I expect my use of the website to continue in the future

  3. CI3:

    It is likely that I will continue to transact with the e-tailer in the near future

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Liao, C., Palvia, P. & Lin, HN. Stage antecedents of consumer online buying behavior. Electron Markets 20, 53–65 (2010). https://doi.org/10.1007/s12525-010-0030-2

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Keywords

  • Expectancy disconfirmation theory
  • Expectation–confirmation model
  • Perceived usefulness
  • Satisfaction