Types of structural assurance and their relationships with trusting intentions in business-to-consumer e-commerce

Abstract

This study examines the effects of different types of structural assurance mechanisms on trusting intention in business-to-consumer electronic commerce. Inconsistent results from prior research on structural assurance motivated the current study to further explore the nature of structural assurance. Based on the Institution-based Trust Theory, this paper proposes that different types of structural assurance mechanisms, specifically: seals of approval, vendor-specific guarantees, protections from credit card companies and transaction protections, may have their unique effects on trusting intentions. The results indicate that customer perceptions about seals of approval and vendor-specific guarantees can significantly influence trusting intentions while perceptions about protections from credit card companies, legal systems and technology infrastructures do not.

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Correspondence to Wei Sha.

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Responsible editor: Hans-Dieter Zimmermann

Appendix 1—survey items

Appendix 1—survey items

Table 7

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Sha, W. Types of structural assurance and their relationships with trusting intentions in business-to-consumer e-commerce. Electron Markets 19, 43–54 (2009). https://doi.org/10.1007/s12525-008-0001-z

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Keywords

  • Structural assurance
  • Trust
  • Institution-based trust
  • Certification
  • Guarantees
  • Consumer service policies