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Table 4 Chemical composition of contemporaneous silver treasure finds including number of their analysed objects. The results are given in wt%

From: Non-destructive handheld XRF study of archaeological composite silver objects—the case study of the late Roman Seuso Treasure

Treasure finds Analytical method No. of analysed objects No. of analyses Ag Cu Au Pb Bi
Mildenhall1 XRF 20 124 93.7–98.0 0.3–4.2 0.4–2.6 0.2–2.2  
Hoxne2 XRF 96 106 85.0–99.0 0.1–4.7 0.1–1.0 0.2–4.4 0–0.3
Kaiseraugst3 XRF 8 15 95.6–98.6 1.0–3.5 0.3–1.3 0.1–0.9  
Vinkovci4 PIXE 49 56 89.1–99.8 0.2–8.9 0.4–3.4 0.1–1.6 0–0.3
Esquiline5 XRF 12 32 88.6–98.3 0.4–10.3 0.2–4.7 0.6–1.0  
Coleraine6 XRF 30 30 88.7–97.5 1.2–6.6 0.4–2.2 0.3–2.3  
Carthage7 XRF 20 52 94.3–97.7 1.9–4.5 0.3–1.1 0.1 – 0.9  
Caubiac (Thil)8 XRF 4 4 93.8–98.2 1.1–4.3 0.4–0.8 0.2–0.6  
Trier9 XRF 1 20 81.9–95.1 2.2–14.6 1.1–2.5 0.3–1.9 0–0.2
Water Newton10 XRF 13 17 88.6–97.9 1.8–9.9 0.2–4.4 0–0.8  
Seuso11 XRF 14a 1620 79.6–99.4 0.1–18.6 0.2–2.4 0.1–1.5 0–0.3
  1. aThe four platters and the Basin of the Seuso Treasure are also included. The minimum–maximum values are given. The number of analyses given for the Seuso Treasure is the sum of the measurements of the two hXRF instruments. 1Hughes and Hall 1979; Lang et al. 1977; Lang and Hughes 2016; 2Cowell and Hook 2010; 3Lang et al. 1984; 4Doračić et al. 2015; Vulić et al. 2017; 5Hughes and Hall 1979; 6Hook and Callewaert 2013; 7Lang 2002; 8Feugère 1988; 9Greiff 2017; 10Hughes and Hall 1979; 11Mozgai et al. 2017; Mozgai et al. 2020; present study